Kentucky Press News Service

New IDs required to fly, visit Fort Knox

January 9, 2019 - 2:08pm
Near the end of 2020, all Kentuckians will need to get a new form of identification if they want to visit Fort Knox or fly. The Kentucky Trans­portation Cabinet announced Monday a rollout of new identification cards. One of the new ID cards, called the voluntary travel ID, is part of an effort to comply with the Real ID Act, a post-9/11 federal law that led to various changes to states’ driver’s licenses standards. Because of the Real ID Act, beginning Oct. 1, 2020, current Ken­tuc­ky identification cards cannot be used to fly within the United States or gain entry to military bases such as Fort Knox. 2019-01-09T11:23:39-05:00

Community honors veteran without family

January 9, 2019 - 2:08pm
After learning a U.S. Army veteran would be buried without family present, Rick Lee of Elizabethtown said he was going to be there. “I’m a veteran,” he said. “I’m going to respect the veterans.” Dozens of people gathered Tuesday afternoon at Kentucky Veterans Cemetery-Central in Radcliff to honor a veteran who had no family listed. 2019-01-09T11:17:57-05:00

Traffic barriers missing from Wilderness Trace Child Development Center

January 9, 2019 - 2:08pm
Six large, bright orange, vinyl traffic barriers used to protect young children with special needs as they enter and leave Wilderness Trace Child Development Center are missing. According to WTCDC executive director Libby Suttles, the school had been closed for two weeks during the holidays, but staff had been coming and going during that time. On Saturday, a staff member said the barriers were there. But when the school reopened on Monday, they were gone, Suttles said. 2019-01-09T11:13:59-05:00

State unveils dashboard for district, school comparisons

January 9, 2019 - 11:08am
Kentucky parents have a new way to hold their school and district leaders accountable through an interactive, web-based tool developed by the state’s Department of Education and the Kentucky Center for Statistics. On Friday, the state unveiled its new Kentucky School Proficiency Dashboard, which allows for comparing proficiency levels of public schools and school districts using the latest state testing data. The dashboard is available online at kystats.ky.gov/reports. 2019-01-09T11:04:55-05:00

A different UK football team

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
Admit it, how many of you thought when a 20-point University of Kentucky lead began to shrink last week in the Citrus Bowl that the “old” Kentucky football was making an untimely appearance to spoil one of the best seasons in school history? Those who may have doubted UK’s magical run to a rare New Year’s Day bowl game surely were convinced after these Wildcats — predicted to hover, as they so often have done, around the .500 mark — didn’t fold like so many other Wildcat teams have over decades. No, when Penn State fought its way to within 27-24 with just minutes remaining Tuesday, not only did UK fight back, but the Wildcats made play after play, picking up key first downs, milking the clock and, as precious seconds ticked off, a rare 10-win season belonged to the Wildcats. 2019-01-08T13:35:39-05:00

Legislators doing it right by listening to constituents

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
Multiple state legislators have recently mailed out surveys to their constituents, asking them where they stand on many issues that may be dealt with during the 2019 General Assembly, which begins today. We commend those who have made this effort to understand what the people want. Some of the questions on the surveys may be written in a leading manner designed to get the answer the politician wants, but the surveys are a gesture in support of our democratic ideals nonetheless. We hope that everyone who receives such a survey fills it out and sends it back. And we hope the legislators who went to the trouble of surveying their constituents put the results of their surveys to good use. 2019-01-08T13:32:45-05:00

Major effort to restrict access to Kentucky open records proposed

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
State Sen. Danny Carroll, a Paducah Republican, has pre-filed a bill that critics said Monday would "eviscerate" Kentucky open records law by restricting access to a host of public material. "This is an effort to destroy the open records law," said Jon Fleischaker, a lawyer for the Kentucky Press Association, the Courier Journal and other media outlets. "It is a disaster for the public. It is a disaster for the citizens of Kentucky." The measure would create a new section of state law that exempts whole categories of records from public inspection — most significantly, any information related to "promotion, appraisal and employee discipline records" of police and many other public employees. 2019-01-08T13:05:31-05:00

Paducah airport celebrates addition of third daily Chicago flight

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
Barkley Regional Airport celebrated the addition of a third daily round-trip flight to Chicago on Monday, a move officials say will pay dividends for the entire region. SkyWest Airlines now offers the additional flight from Chicago's O'Hare International Airport to Paducah, with a stop in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. Local officials, along with representatives of SkyWest and the Cape Girardeau airport, held a brief morning ceremony and ribbon-cutting to mark the occasion. 2019-01-08T12:56:14-05:00

Legislators expected to quickly take up contested race

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
When members of the state House of Representatives meet Tuesday, Jan. 8 for the first day of business in this year's General Assembly, a question they'll have to decide is what to do about the contested 13th District House seat. Jim Glenn, a Democrat, won the seat, which covers the city of Owensboro, in November. Glenn defeated Republican incumbent DJ Johnson by one vote. The election result was confirmed in a recanvass and certified by the Secretary of State, and Glenn was sworn in by a Circuit Court judge last week. But state law allows for election contests in House races to be decided by the House. The law is somewhat vague on how such contests should proceed, but legislators can take depositions and hear evidence. 2019-01-08T12:51:49-05:00

Tennessee man in custody after chase

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
For a few hours Monday, the south side of Murray was the scene of the ultimate game of cat and mouse. Law enforcement officials from at least five agencies swarmed that area in search of someone they say led them on a high-speed pursuit from neighboring Henry County, Tennessee that morning. The dangerous chase ended in a neighborhood near the intersection of Kirkwood and Belmont drives in Murray, with the alleged driver jumping out of the vehicle and fleeing into a field. 2019-01-08T12:45:26-05:00

Kroger shooting suspect pleads not guilty to hate crime charges

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
Gregory Bush, the man accused of shooting and killing two black shoppers at a Louisville-area Kroger grocery last fall, pleaded not guilty in his first appearance Monday in U.S. District Court to federal hate crimes that could bring the death penalty. Bush, 51, who is white, has already pleaded not guilty to state charges for the murders of Maurice Stallard, 69, and Vickie Lee Jones, 67 — at the Kroger in Jeffersontown on Oct. 24. Wearing a dark green jumpsuit with his hands and feet shackled, Bush shuffled into U.S. Magistrate Judge Colin Lindsay's courtroom accompanied by U.S. Marshalls, where he was arraigned on three federal hate crime charges and three federal gun charges. 2019-01-08T12:37:30-05:00

School safety bill will deal with counselors, security — but not guns

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
The shooting at Marshall County High School that killed two students and injured 18 others a year ago this month was the kind of tragedy that demanded a government response. That response may come during this year's regular legislative session, which begins Tuesday. The Marshall County shooting was followed less than a month later by an even deadlier tragedy — a shooting at a Parkland, Florida, high school that left 17 students and staff dead. At the time, leaders of the Kentucky General Assembly decided on a deliberate response to develop a thoughtful and effective plan to address the complex issue of school safety. 2019-01-08T12:29:25-05:00

Adam Edelen launches gubernatorial campaign ‘for all Kentucky’

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
Former Kentucky State Auditor Adam Edelen officially launched his 2019 gubernatorial campaign Monday, creating a competitive three-way Democratic primary for the chance to presumably challenge Governor Matt Bevin for the highest office in the state. From a podium inside Courthouse Square in Lexington, Edelen emphasized his rural Kentucky roots and pledged a brighter future for Kentucky through education, health care and modernizing the economy. 2019-01-08T12:20:05-05:00

Man faces animal cruelty, other charge after Estill County rescue dog shot to death

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
The search for a missing rescue dog came to a sad end Monday. Hunter, a full-blooded bloodhound, was found dead from a gunshot wound, according to Waco Fire and Rescue Station 14. The dog was found by a LEX18 news photographer that was reporting on the dog’s disappearance in the area, LEX18 reported. The station said he was shot multiple times. A dog used to find missing people is lost, the Estill County Rescue Squad said Monday. State police arrested Charles Collins, 59, of Irvine Monday night and charged him with cruelty to animals and assault on a service animal, according to the Three Forks Regional Jail website. 2019-01-08T12:14:51-05:00

As Kentucky waits to see if Bevin will run again, another Republican enters the race

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
Republican state legislator who has been in office less than a year announced Tuesday he will run for governor, ensuring Gov. Matt Bevin will have at least one challenger if he makes good on his pledge to seek re-election. Rep. Robert Goforth, of Laurel County, said Bevin doesn’t deserve a second term. “We need a governor who leads more than he lambasts,” Goforth said. “It’s time to put an end to Matt Bevin’s corporate-first agenda.” He said Bevin is arrogant and not really a Kentuckian. 2019-01-08T11:49:05-05:00

Thayer: GOP, governor fine, ready for session

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
Sen. Damon Thayer, R-Georgetown, said it is time state legislators and the public move on from the chaos of last year with the controversy over the pension reform bill and ill-fated special session. The Kentucky General Assembly convenes today, Jan. 8, and while pension reform remains a priority there are other issues that must be addressed. Thayer said he and other GOP leaders met with Gov. Matt Bevin to discourage calling a special session a week before Christmas. Bevin disputes Thayer, but several sources have told the News-Graphic such meetings did take place up to just hours before the session was called. 2019-01-08T11:41:05-05:00

Planning a vacation? Don’t forget to apply for new travel ID

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
Dreaming about summer vacations offer the perfect escape during these dull, gray January days. The new year is also an ideal time to apply for a voluntary travel ID, which also serves as a driver’s license and will become necessary for all travelers in late 2020. In March, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet will begin issuing the voluntary travel ID, which complies with new federal travel standards and will be required to board domestic flights starting in October of next year. 2019-01-08T11:37:39-05:00

Shutdown a slow down for area Lincoln sites

January 8, 2019 - 2:08pm
Regina McDowell was alone Monday morning inside the Lincoln Lodge Gift Shop in Hodgenville, a hundred yards or so from one of LaRue County’s biggest tourist draws each year — the shutdown Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park. “It’s usually slow this time of year, but it’s been especially slow lately,” McDowell said. A partial U.S. govern­ment shutdown that is nearing three weeks has had an impact on Mc­Dowell’s business. She said the closure of the park has kept tourists away. 2019-01-08T11:32:16-05:00

2019 political predictions: Donald Trump will be impeached

January 7, 2019 - 2:07pm
Making predictions in a political universe with Donald Trump at the center is like walking into a casino expecting to emerge with your wallet intact — the house always wins, and you feel dumber for having played. She knows better, but House Speaker Nancy Pelosi will fail at holding back the bloodthirsty partisans in her conference. Exacerbated by a fast-starting presidential primary featuring candidates desperate to please liberal crowds and donors, Pelosi will succumb to the pressure to impeach despite the enormous risk of 2020 backlash. Unless there is truly a bombshell in Mueller’s report that links directly to Trump, the Senate will not convict the president. 2019-01-07T13:50:26-05:00

Yes, Jim Gray was a ‘vision guy.’ And a lot more.

January 7, 2019 - 2:07pm
The praise for Jim Gray, who turned over Lexington’s mayor’s office to Linda Gorton on Sunday, is well deserved; there’s not much to add, though we will stress one point: Gray’s “big dreams” became reality because he’s a strong manager who was eager to listen and learn. The competence and consensus-building in Gray’s city hall stand in sharp contrast to the governments in Frankfort and Washington, where ideology, sycophancy and conflict reign. 2019-01-07T13:48:11-05:00

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