Kentucky Press News Service

Analyst: Corvette plant may be 'insulated' from tariff impact

August 6, 2018 - 12:19pm
It didn't take long for General Motors and Ford to feel the impact of tariffs President Donald Trump imposed on steel and aluminum. The two automakers last month reduced their full-year earnings forecasts by a combined total of about $3 billion. However, an auto industry analyst and a local GM spokeswoman said don't expect the Bowling Green-made Chevrolet Corvette to be significantly affected by the Trump administration's trade policies. 2018-08-06T10:55:57-04:00

Kentucky woman drowns in North Carolina

August 6, 2018 - 12:19pm
A 49-year-old Clay City woman has drown in a rip current while swimming in North Carolina. WKYT reports authorities at Emerald Isle said Donna Sue Miller died about 7 p.m. Sunday. 2018-08-06T10:51:05-04:00

Educators must consider much more than teaching

August 6, 2018 - 12:19pm
Back-to-school season just feels a little different this year. It really isn’t one thing, but instead a myriad of issues that will likely continue to create challenges for public education this school year and many more to come. And I’m not just talking about the fact my daughters who are going into third and fifth grades and are, officially or not, definitely “tweens.” That will create challenges for years to come, too! 2018-08-06T10:43:46-04:00

Newspaper election policies ensure fair, equal coverage

August 6, 2018 - 12:19pm
Sometimes you see something that leaves you asking, “What were they thinking?” In a recent case, “they” would be a candidate in Spencer County and the newspaper that carried an advertisement featuring a blatantly racist message. Rightfully so, the Democratic Party condemned the advertisement Thursday. In a tweet made by the Kentucky Democratic Party, the ad was called “offensive” and “appalling,” light words for such a message that was disseminated to likely thousands of homes in the weekly publication. 2018-08-06T10:39:51-04:00

Rolling back auto rules unwise

August 6, 2018 - 12:19pm
New vehicles today get an average of 25 miles per gallon, a 23 percent increase over the past 10 years. Current regulations call for doubling that average by 2026. But the Trump administration issued a plan this week that would roll back requirements for automakers to continue to increase the fuel economy of cars, SUVs and pickup trucks in the coming decade. It's a bad idea. Higher fuel-efficiency has considerable economic and environmental benefits, saving drivers a lot of money at the pump and reducing air pollution. What also bothers me about the plan is the dubious claim that forcing automakers to increase mileage standards will lead to more driving accidents and deaths. 2018-08-06T10:31:57-04:00

Carp disaster demands an all-hands approach

August 6, 2018 - 12:19pm
In science fiction movies ecological disasters always involve something a bit more titillating -- killer bees or genetically modified piranhas decimate the church picnic to the consternation of the local Chamber of Commerce. But carp? It could never be carp. How boring. We think this is a reason why what is the greatest ecological disaster in America right now gets scant notice from the national media and leading environmental groups. How could it be carp? People grasp the seriousness of the issue here at ground zero however. 2018-08-06T10:28:18-04:00

The state of Kentucky politics: 3 key takeaways from Fancy Farm 2018

August 6, 2018 - 12:19pm
The political speaking at Fancy Farm this year was its usual rowdy self with barbs flying between Democrats and Republicans, offering a glimpse into the state of Kentucky politics. Absent were Gov. Matt Bevin and U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, but present were a host of others as well as a throng of Kentucky teachers, energized by Republicans' push to pass pension reform late in the legislative session. With the political speaking event at St. Jerome Catholic Church's 138th annual picnic on Saturday now in the rearview mirror, here are takeaways from Courier Journal reporters Phillip M. Bailey and Deborah Yetter and columnist Joseph Gerth, who were on hand to witness the verbal jousting. 2018-08-06T10:09:09-04:00

Bevin championed new child-welfare law. Now it’s time to make it work

August 6, 2018 - 12:19pm
A pair of new state and federal child-welfare laws demand swift, capable action by Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration. So, here’s hoping kids and taxpayers get more out of the governor’s new “special advisers” than they did from his “adoption czar.” Kentucky will pay Chris and Alicia Johnson $165,000 a year to assume the role previously held by Dan Dumas, a Baptist pastor, who was paid $20,000 a month until Bevin cut him loose after seven months with $60,000 in termination pay. (Starting pay for a state social worker at the time was about $33,600 a year.) 2018-08-06T10:05:32-04:00

Trading problems is no real solution

August 6, 2018 - 12:19pm
The federal government announced July 24 that it would be funneling up to $12 billion in aid to American farmers hurt by the escalating trade war brought about by U.S. tariffs placed on foreign imports. The necessity to subsidize or prop up agriculture to this extent should provide clear evidence that President Donald Trump’s wide-ranging list of duties placed on imported aluminum, steel, newsprint and other raw materials and produced goods from Canada, China, Mexico, European Union countries and elsewhere are hurting, not helping, American industry. While some American farmers might experience a degree of relief in the short term, no one wins in the long run when a flawed policy necessitates bailouts of this magnitude. 2018-08-06T10:00:00-04:00

Glad to learn Paul will back Kavanaugh

August 6, 2018 - 12:19pm
The president of the United States has many tough responsibilities and tasks on a daily basis. One of the most important of those tasks is nominating a Supreme Court justice upon the death or retirement of a former justice. The person the president nominates, if confirmed by the U.S. Senate, can sit on our nation’s high court for decades, as it is a lifetime appointment. We expressed in an earlier editorial that we believed President Donald Trump made an excellent choice in nominating Brett Kavanaugh, U.S. circuit judge of the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. 2018-08-06T09:54:07-04:00

Teen dies from dirt bike accident injuries

August 6, 2018 - 12:19pm
A Mason County teenager involved in a one-vehicle accident on Saturday has died. Mason County Sheriff Patrick Boggs said 19-year-old Tyler Grannis was operating a dirt bike along Flat Fork Road, off Kentucky 161, in the May’s Lick area on Saturday, when he lost control of the vehicle and wrecked. According to Boggs, Grannis was not wearing a helmet and sustained head injuries as a result of the crash. 2018-08-06T09:46:54-04:00

Drug program's results encouraging, police say

August 6, 2018 - 12:19pm
Less than a year after announcing the Angel Initiative, aimed at helping place drug users in treatment programs, Kentucky State Police are encouraged about the results. Since officially rolling out the program in March, KSP Post 1 in Mayfield has helped five people get into treatment, spokesman Jay Thomas said. "The day that we kicked it off, we had two people come to the post within 48 hours," Thomas said. The initiative encourages people seeking treatment for drug addiction to visit a Kentucky State Police post, where a local officer will assist them with finding a treatment program. 2018-08-06T09:27:09-04:00

Mom breastfeeds adopted daughter

August 6, 2018 - 12:19pm
Whether they make the decision to breastfeed or not, most mothers are aware of the nutritional, emotional and psychological benefits it can have for a baby. But there is one misconception about breastfeeding that Candice Greer, 29, of Paducah wants to clear up: It's possible for all women, even adoptive mothers like herself. Like many adoptive mothers, Greer believed the misconception that because she would not give birth to the baby, she would not be able to provide the child with her breastmilk. 2018-08-06T09:21:20-04:00

Jail questions federal inmates increase

August 6, 2018 - 9:19am
The Daviess County Detention Center has increased the number of federal inmates housed there, but Daviess County Jailer Art Maglinger is re-evaluating the benefits that come from taking them in before deciding to take on more. Maglinger has asked for an internal cost analysis to determine how much the jail is making from housing federal inmates in comparison to what it is contributing, which has turned out to be slightly more than it expects to receive for state inmates or inmates from other counties. 2018-08-06T09:14:43-04:00

What you need to know before attending the Kentucky State Fair 2018

August 6, 2018 - 9:19am
The 2018 Kentucky State Fair runs Aug. 16-26, and with it brings everything from a free concert series to adventurous food to the World's Championship Horse Show. Before planning your trip, here are some key tidbits of information to make your experience that much smoother. 2018-08-06T09:09:19-04:00

Kentucky's effort to screen medical malpractice claims falls flat

August 6, 2018 - 9:19am
A Republican-backed law that requires Kentuckians to submit malpractice claims to a review panel before they can file lawsuits has produced a morass of delay in its first year on the books. Only 11 percent of 531 claims have been assigned to a panel and findings have been issued in just 3 percent, according to figures obtained from the state by the Courier-Journal under the Kentucky Open Records Act. Another 5 percent were withdrawn, settled or dismissed. Doug Hogan, a spokesman for the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, which runs the program, insists it is working because there are "hundreds of cases in various stages of review before the panels." But even lawyers who defend doctors, hospitals and nursing homes say the process so far has been ineffective. 2018-08-06T09:02:53-04:00

His video brought in thousands of dollars to make these schools safer. Here’s how.

August 6, 2018 - 9:19am
In February, when the nation was reeling from school shootings in Western Kentucky and Florida, Corbin attorney Shane Romines posted a Facebook video offering to pay for walk-through metal detectors for South Central Kentucky schools. He encouraged parents and others to donate to their schools, too. As school opened in the Barbourville Independent district Thursday, the results of that offer were apparent as students streamed through a walk-through metal detector and school staff and a law enforcement officer aided in student searches. East Bernstadt Independent School District and Knox County Schools also installed walk-through metal detectors with donations from Romines. 2018-08-06T08:54:29-04:00

Coal piles up at power plant as cheap natural gas wrecks Eastern Kentucky’s economy

August 6, 2018 - 9:19am
A utility that serves Eastern Kentucky and burns coal to produce electricity has sold $17.6 million worth of coal it didn’t need, offering yet another example of how the relatively low cost of natural gas has undermined the region’s economy. The coal was to be used at a power plant in West Virginia co-owned by Kentucky Power, which has 168,000 customers in 20 Eastern Kentucky counties. The plant, though, could not generate electricity as cheaply as competing facilities fueled by natural gas, according to information filed with the Kentucky Public Service Commission. As a result, the regional power-grid manager was not ordering electricity as often from Kentucky Power’s Mitchell plant. That meant coal the company had to buy under a long-term contract was piling up. 2018-08-06T08:48:54-04:00

She taught herself to fly. At 94, she receives prestigious medal for WWII service.

August 6, 2018 - 9:19am
When Mary Pat Shely was young, she taught herself to fly in a Piper Cub bought for her by her father. On Sunday, she was given a Congressional Gold Medal for her service in the Civil Air Patrol during World War II. The World War II members of the Civil Air Patrol, an auxiliary of the United States Air Force, were awarded the gold medal as a group in 2014. Since then, the organization has worked to find the surviving members of the patrol who served during World War II. More than 75 years after she joined the patrol in 1942, current Civil Air Patrol members, family members and neighbors gathered at the Aviation Museum of Kentucky to watch Shely receive the medal from Andy Barr, U.S. Representative for Kentucky’s Sixth District. 2018-08-06T08:42:44-04:00

Mothers line up for breastfeeding photo shoot

August 6, 2018 - 9:19am
Four years ago, a local photographer decided to start celebrating International Breastfeeding week by taking photos of mothers feeding their children. She continued that growing tradition again this past Saturday in Valor Hall. Hayley Stell photographed around 40 women feeding their children. “I do this during the week to celebrate the mommas,” she explained. It’s partly to document the mothers and their journey through breastfeeding. 2018-08-06T08:29:49-04:00

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