Kentucky Press News Service

Anti-doxing bill would help protect children from online attacks

March 8, 2019 - 2:58pm
A proposed law in Kentucky that would make it illegal for someone to publish the personal information of a child online with the intent to harass them also sheds light on how far out of control people can get on social media. Senate Bill 240, which would ban “doxing” — which means to “search for and publish private or identifying information about a particular individual on the internet, typically with malicious intent” — of minors passed the Senate 26-10 Thursday. Sen. Wil Schroder, a Northern Kentucky Republican and candidate for attorney general, sponsored the bill. 2019-03-08T13:41:59-05:00

Ceremony fitting tribute for late WWII soldier

March 8, 2019 - 2:58pm
“My daddy is a hero.” This was a very fitting headline in Tuesday’s newspaper. The headline was in reference to the late Isaac Nathaniel Taylor, who served as a private first class in the U.S. Army from 1943-46. The comment in the headline was made by his daughter, Sibaria Taylor, at a ceremony Monday in which U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Bowling Green presented Taylor and members of her family with new ribbons and medals as replacements for those lost in the years before her father’s death in 2007. 2019-03-08T13:39:26-05:00

State officials: Widespread flu activity reported for 10th consecutive week

March 8, 2019 - 2:58pm
The Department for Public Health reports flu activity in Kentucky is at “widespread” for the 10th consecutive week. Widespread is the highest level of flu activity, indicating increased flu-like activity or flu outbreaks in at least half of the state’s regions 2019-03-08T13:10:28-05:00

Pence to make appearance in Lexington for Bevin

March 8, 2019 - 2:58pm
Vice President Mike Pence will make a campaign appearance in Lexington Friday evening for Gov. Matt Bevin, a Republican. The fund-raising event will be held at the Aviation Museum of Kentucky, adjacent to Blue Grass Airport. The event is by invitation-only. 2019-03-08T13:02:17-05:00

Driver pleads guilty to role in 2017 homicides

March 8, 2019 - 2:58pm
The person who drove multiple armed men to a Winchester apartment building prior to a fatal shootout could serve up to 11 years in prison. Mikaela Buford, 19, admitted Thursday that she drove Denzel Hill, Darian Skinner and Ronnie Ellis to 27 E. Washington St. on Nov. 7, 2017, moments before shots were fired that killed two 16-year-old girls. Buford pleaded guilty Thursday to two counts of facilitation to commit murder and one count of complicity to first-degree wanton endangerment. 2019-03-08T12:56:32-05:00

Former teacher pleads not guilty to harassing communications

March 8, 2019 - 2:58pm
A former McCracken County High School teacher pleaded not guilty Thursday to a misdemeanor count of harassing communications. Prosecutors allege Mark "Daniel" Edwards, 29, sent a lewd message to a former student. He appeared in McCracken County District Court for an arraignment. 2019-03-08T12:49:45-05:00

Natcher Parkway now Interstate 165

March 8, 2019 - 2:58pm
Crews began installing new "Interstate 165" signs along the 72-mile Natcher Parkway on Wednesday. The process is expected to take up to two weeks. That means the four-lane highway between Owensboro and Bowling Green is now an interstate highway -- even though work is continuing on upgrades. 2019-03-08T12:47:08-05:00

Abortion is not same as slavery or lynching, some Kentucky lawmakers say

March 8, 2019 - 2:58pm
Offended by comparisons of abortion to slavery, lynching and the Holocaust, a small group of House Democrats on Thursday called on abortion opponents to tone down such rhetoric during the legislative session. “These comparisons are beyond appalling,” said Rep. Attica Scott of Louisville. “In no way is it just or fair to compare a woman’s legal right to choose what happens with her own body to the evil legacy of slavery and lynching in our country and the Holocaust during World War II.” Scott and others at the event, which was held by the Black Legislative Caucus and the Women’s House Democratic Caucus, said such comparisons have created “a hostile and toxic work environment” during the legislative session. 2019-03-08T12:39:06-05:00

U of L criticizes professor's homophobic email to Louisville Ballet

March 8, 2019 - 2:58pm
The Louisville Ballet is pushing back against "hateful" comments concerning a recent show featuring an LGBT love story, including an email from a University of Louisville faculty member whose words have been criticized by school leaders. The ballet recently published an "Open Letter Against Hatred and Prejudice" after receiving homophobic and derogatory responses about "Human Abstract," a show that prominently featured a same-sex relationship and ended its run Sunday. 2019-03-08T12:31:57-05:00

JCPS, union agreement could avoid future teacher ‘sickouts’

March 8, 2019 - 2:58pm
A new agreement between Jefferson County Public Schools and its teachers union could help the district avoid more teacher sickouts. Three teachers from each JCPS school would be selected to rally in Frankfort for each day in the session next week, beginning Tuesday, according to an email shared with Insider Louisville. That would mean more than 500 people from JCPS alone to continue a wave of protests over public education, but no district closures. 2019-03-08T12:22:17-05:00

Medicaid expansion threatened by last-minute move in Frankfort, advocacy group says

March 8, 2019 - 2:58pm
The Kentucky Equal Justice Center is sounding the alarm about a new House floor amendment to a bill that it says will make it easier for Gov. Matt Bevin to repeal Medicaid expansion. The center sent out an emergency alert Thursday afternoon urging people to call their legislators to protest a floor amendment attached to Senate Bill 167, an uncontroversial bill that passed the full Senate by a unanimous vote last month. Kentucky Voices for Health has issued a similar alert. The amendment, filed by Rep. Kim Moser, R-Taylor Mill, would give Adam Meier, secretary of the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, the discretion to turn down federal funds. 2019-03-08T12:19:07-05:00

'A loss for the state.’ UK cuts Kentucky Archaeological Survey, 12 jobs amid changes

March 8, 2019 - 2:58pm
Twelve University of Kentucky employees will lose their jobs— and the state will lose numerous archaeological resources— amid a restructuring of the Department of Anthropology. Under a plan announced by the College of Arts and Sciences, UK will eliminate the Kentucky Archaeological Survey and the Program for Archaeological Research, which work on numerous public and private archeological projects around the state. Those programs are currently under the anthropology department’s William S. Webb Museum, which houses archaeological collections and artifacts at a building on Export Street. The affected employees — seven full-time and five part-time — were informed last week of the changes by Arts and Sciences Dean Mark Kornbluh. 2019-03-08T12:15:02-05:00

Black lung is surging, but bill to undo limits on doctors stalls without a hearing

March 8, 2019 - 2:58pm
A bill that would have rescinded restrictions on the types of physicians who can diagnose black lung disease will likely not get a vote in the Kentucky House of Representatives this year, said Rep. Angie Hatton, one of the bill’s sponsors. The proposal’s likely failure comes amid the largest resurgence of black lung in decades, one that has left more than 20 percent of Central Appalachian coal miners with the deadly and incurable disease. House Bill 75 would have undone a portion of a bill passed last year that imposed new limits on the types of physicians who can diagnose black lung. Critics say that bill, House Bill 2, made it harder for miners seeking black lung benefits to succeed in their claims. 2019-03-08T12:10:46-05:00

Feeding America Report: 1 in 6 adults, 1 in 4 children in Christian County at risk of going hungry

March 8, 2019 - 11:58am
Hopkinsville officials and nonprofit agency leaders met at the table with Feeding America staff Wednesday to determine how to get food to locals who are food insecure. According to the 2016 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1 in 6 adults in Christian County are at risk of going hungry, 1 in 4 children aren't getting the amount of meals they need, and 1 in 5 military families struggle to buy food. "It's our seniors, it's our kids and it's our struggling working families," said Feeding America Kentucky's Heartland executive director Jamie Sizemore. "They will pay the bills and make sure they can get to work, but what's last on that list? Food. It's a real struggle." 2019-03-08T11:44:51-05:00

Lexington ABC, bar fail to reach agreement

March 8, 2019 - 11:58am
The Lexington Alcoholic Beverage Control Office and Horseshoes Kentucky Grill & Saloon failed to reach an agreement after a closed hearing Tuesday on a show cause hearing regarding a fatal January collision on I-75. The hearing was on if Horseshoes should be penalized for serving Joey Lee Bailey, 41, of Georgetown, who after leaving the establishment drove the wrong way on northbound I-75 and struck a vehicle, killing himself and all five members of the Abbas family from Michigan. 2019-03-08T11:37:18-05:00

Former coach enters not guilty plea for sexual abuse charge

March 8, 2019 - 11:58am
A former Eminence Independent Schools freshman basketball team coach pleaded not guilty on Wednesday to a sexual abuse charge. Travis Xavier Green, 24, appeared in front of Judge Diana Wheeler at the Henry County Temporary Courthouse in Eminence, on a charge of first degree sexual abuse. Green, on behalf of his attorney, gave a plea of not guilty. Prosecutor and County Attorney Jennie Harrod told the court that when Green's electronic devices come back from the lab, he will most likely be facing new criminal charges. Harrod also said additional charges will be coming out of Franklin County. 2019-03-08T11:31:20-05:00

Bill banning new payday lenders heads to Bevin’s desk

March 8, 2019 - 11:58am
A bill that would create a permanent ban on new payday lender business licenses quietly passed the Kentucky House Thursday and is headed to Gov. Matt Bevin’s desk. Senate Bill 145 would create two distinct business licenses where Kentucky currently only has one: a check-cashing license for businesses that simply cash a check and charge a fee for doing so; and a deferred deposit license for so-called payday lenders who offer high-interest, short-term loans. 2019-03-08T11:22:28-05:00

HPV vaccination rate increasing statewide, but still low

March 8, 2019 - 11:58am
Human papillomavirus is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the nation, with about one in four Americans currently infected, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vaccination against the potentially cancer-causing infection is increasing statewide, but Kentucky children remain among the least vaccinated in the U.S. Dr. Rebecca Shadowen, an infectious disease specialist at The Medical Center at Bowling Green, offered a few explanations for the Bluegrass’ resistance to vaccination. 2019-03-08T11:09:54-05:00

Jailhouse interview with alleged killer

March 8, 2019 - 11:58am
“I don’t kill, I steal; I’m not a killer,” said accused murderer Phillip Lee Lewis during a jailhouse interview Tuesday. Lewis was taken into local custody Monday. He is charged with murder and robbery in the first degree in connection to a shooting at the A and B Quick Stop on Jan. 16, that left Gary Wayne Medlin, of Gray, dead. 2019-03-08T11:02:52-05:00

Political polarization an unnecessary problem

March 7, 2019 - 2:57pm
Political polarization is a bigger problem in Boyle County than in most counties around the U.S., according to reporting from The Atlantic this week. A study of political prejudice commissioned by the magazine found — no surprise here — growing mistrust of “others” and increasingly bulletproof bubbles of political homogeneity across the country. Boyle County residents appear to be more politically “prejudiced” against their “political others” than about 68 percent of U.S. counties, according to the study. More extreme prejudice was found in counties to the north of Boyle, while counties in south central Kentucky appear to be less prejudiced. 2019-03-07T13:38:02-05:00

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