Kentucky Press News Service

Volunteers set to clean area roadsides

October 8, 2018 - 2:12pm
State roads will be getting spruced up starting Monday by groups of volunteers. Adopt-a-Highway groups across the state will take to the streets throughout the week as part of the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s Fall Sweep program to clear roadside litter. The Fall Sweep campaign lasts through Sunday and is one of three weeklong Adopt-a-Highway cleaning campaigns, along with ones in the spring and summer. 2018-10-08T13:14:20-04:00

Now more than ever journalism matters

October 8, 2018 - 2:12pm
Oct. 7 through 13 is National Newspaper Week and this newspaper like many around the country will be participating in promoting it. This year’s theme is “Journalism matters. NOW more than ever.” We will be devoting space to editorials and cartoons that highlight and reinforce the importance of having a newspaper within our community. 2018-10-08T13:05:55-04:00

Tuesday is the last day to register to vote in Kentucky’s General Election. Here’s how.

October 8, 2018 - 2:12pm
Tuesday is the last day to register to vote in Kentucky’s General Election, and there are a few options to get it done. Kentucky residents can visit GoVoteKy.com to either register or update voter registration. The process takes just a few minutes. 2018-10-08T12:50:17-04:00

Report: Industrial real estate expected to have ‘a year for the record books’

October 8, 2018 - 2:12pm
The numbers and facts jump off the pages like bursts of fireworks. A third-quarter analysis from the international real estate behemoth CBRE contains proclamations like “second-best quarter ever,” “annual total shatters record” and “2018 will definitely be a year for the record books.” This not an anomaly for the industrial real estate market. The market, fueled by suppliers, factories, warehouses, distribution centers and others, has been the strongest local segment for several years and for many reasons. “Proximity to UPS Worldport is a factor,” said Kevin Grove, senior vice president at CBRE in Louisville. “Proximity to two-thirds of the entire U.S. population in a day’s drive is a factor. Good, available land is a factor. The Ohio River and the CSX rail lines are factors. So is a strong available labor force.” 2018-10-08T11:27:07-04:00

The other circus

October 8, 2018 - 2:12pm
Tuesday was a special day for the county as there were two circuses in town. Both had clowns and people doing and saying crazy things. One circus was wholesome fun for the entire family. The other circus had some holes. One was at the Expo Center and the other at the court house. 2018-10-08T11:22:16-04:00

Clean up vital, but prevention most importance

October 8, 2018 - 2:12pm
Kentucky Transportation Cabinet officials announced Friday that the annual fall cleanup along the state’s roadways will be this week. State officials reported that each year, transportation cabinet employees and contractors spend 200,000 hours collecting approximately 96,000 bags of litter along state highways. That’s a sad figure. 2018-10-08T11:18:30-04:00

Problems in Kentucky’s nursing homes are matter of life, death. Time for state to act.

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
If you live in Kentucky, there is a good chance you or a loved one will eventually spend time in one of the state’s 284 nursing homes. So if you read nothing else this month, read a series by John Cheves, an award-winning investigative reporter for the Herald-Leader. Cheves found that the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has rated 43 percent of Kentucky’s nursing homes either “below average” or “much below average,” citing substandard care that in some cases has been fatal. Kentucky’s nursing homes collectively have been rated among the worst in the nation in recent studies by the Kaiser Family Foundation, the AARP and advocacy group Families For Better Care. 2018-10-08T11:03:40-04:00

Friends who saw Trinity Gay’s final moments set to testify in trial in her Lexington shooting

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
The trial of four defendants charged in connection with the 2016 shooting death of Trinity Gay, the daughter of Olympian Tyson Gay, is scheduled to start Monday. Trinity, 15, a track star at Lafayette High School, died after being shot in the neck during an exchange of gunfire between two vehicles at Cook Out restaurant on South Broadway. Chazerae Me’Lon Taylor Sr., 40, is charged with murder. His son, D’Markeo Taylor, 21, is charged with wanton endangerment in connection with the shooting. 2018-10-08T10:54:31-04:00

Cries for help ignored too long. Legislature must act to improve nursing homes.

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
Imagine being in pain or afraid, and your cries for help go ignored. If you’re in a Kentucky nursing home, you’re ignored because there are too few nurses and nurse’s aides to go around. No one — not even in the nursing home industry — disputes that. Why the legislature ignores the cries for help is harder to fathom. As John Cheves’ powerful reporting reminds us, legislative leaders have long been stubbornly incurious about how to improve care for the elderly and disabled, even though the state is responsible for overseeing nursing homes and holds their purse strings via Medicaid. We don’t expect easy solutions. The nursing home industry is a powerful lobby. But for the legislature to keep ignoring the problems in the face of so much suffering is cowardly and wrong and must end. 2018-10-08T10:50:48-04:00

What was director Ron Howard doing in Kentucky?

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
Academy Award-winning director Ron Howard spent some time in Eastern Kentucky last week. While the reason for the visit wasn’t publicized, a good guess might be that it has something to do with the movie version of “Hillbilly Elegy,” which Howard is directing. A few people in Breathitt County posted photos online that they took while meeting the director, who visited Wednesday with “Hillbilly Elegy” author J.D. Vance. Vance grew up in Middletown, Ohio, but spent time with family in Breathitt County as a child and wrote about it in his memoir. 2018-10-08T10:45:15-04:00

Time to start owning our mistakes

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
Visit any basketball court in America during a pick-up game and you’ll usually hear two words — “my bad” — over and over again. It is the universally accepted way to take ownership of a mistake and move forward. Unfortunately, this idea seems to end when you step outside the lines. Taking personal responsibility appears to be an often-forgotten concept in our world today. We hear pundits lament the root cause of all the negative things in our society. Drugs. Erosion of Christian values. Breakdown of the nuclear family. Hollywood. The media. The list goes on and on. There may truth to each of these, but an overlooked element is the cold, hard fact we have become a culture of blamers. 2018-10-08T10:20:08-04:00

Overturn of sales tax on nonprofits needed

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
We stated in a July 8 editorial that we believed the Republican-controlled legislature was wrong to pass legislation that imposed a 6 percent sales tax on nonprofit organizations. We are still of that opinion. It’s worth noting that the legislation, House Bill 487, was passed near the end of the legislative session without the required three readings. This showed a total lack of transparency on behalf of the legislature and caught many of these nonprofits off guard. Due to the lack of transparency, many nonprofits had little time to become aware of what was happening to them. As a result, their voices went largely unheard. 2018-10-08T10:17:07-04:00

Teamsters approve a deal with UPS, even though most voted against it

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
Despite most of the votes being against it, Teamsters ratified a national labor deal with UPS Friday. Voting by union members has been underway since September. And votes were totaled Friday night — 50,248, or 54.2 percent, voting against and 42,356, or 45.8 percent, voting for the deal, according to a UPS spokesman. If less than 50 percent of members vote on the National Master Agreement, union rules require a contract be rejected by two-thirds, or about 67 percent, of the votes. Of the 209,043 members who were eligible to vote, only 92,604 (44.3 percent) cast a vote. 2018-10-08T09:19:57-04:00

Couple's death believed to be murder-suicide

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
A husband and wife found dead of gunshot wounds in their Graves County home Friday died as a result of a murder-suicide, an investigation showed. Mitchell Laws, 54, fatally shot his wife, Rhonda Laws, 51, before killing himself, according to preliminary results from the death investigation. "At the conclusion of our investigation, with the evidence presented at the scene, it appears that Mitchell shot his wife and then shot himself," Graves County Sheriff's Detective Steve Halsell said. 2018-10-08T09:05:52-04:00

Suspended Reidland bingo has a troubled history with money

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
The recent indictment of two people affiliated with the Reidland Boosters Club is only the latest in a string of financial issues besetting the bingo operation in the past decade. The Kentucky Department of Charitable Gaming ordered an emergency suspension of Reidland Boosters Club's license in late August after an audit, according to a report obtained from an open records request. The most recent investigation, covering the period between January of 2015 and July of 2016, found that more than $110,000 was unaccounted for, or spent for purposes unrelated to those covered by the charitable gaming license. 2018-10-08T08:56:36-04:00

Owensboro Chamber wants more home rule for local governments

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
In 1980, the Kentucky General Assembly passed home rule legislation to give local governments more power. But it didn't go far enough, Candance Brake, president of the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce, said last week. "Our big issue this year is home rule," she said. "Cities of the second class like Owensboro have their hands tied when it comes to raising revenue. But cities of the fourth and fifth class can have a restaurant tax for recreation and infrastructure. Smaller cities can raise revenue from different sources, but we can't. We want to try to get home rule more flexible." 2018-10-08T08:52:24-04:00

Kentucky's own Brett 'Kavanaugh' has had a 'crazy couple of weeks'

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
He's never testified before a Senate committee, he's never sat on an appellate court bench and he's never been confirmed to the Supreme Court, but Brett Kavanagh has had a rough couple of weeks. While he was at work this past Thursday, the topic of his name came up. And it was the last straw. So he took to Twitter and shared his thoughts. The 27-year-old's misfortune of having a similar name to a 53-year-old controversial judge went viral, and more than 147,000 people have retweeted and nearly one million have favorited his observation. “Dude, it was literally like a machine gun,” Kavanagh said. “It was like my phone caught a virus. It was constantly vibrating.” 2018-10-08T08:43:04-04:00

Year of the teacher? Wave of Kentucky legislature candidates say it's real

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
After years of state budgets with no money for teacher raises, the passage of a law allowing charter schools and a proposal to cut teachers' pension benefits, Denise Gray decided she needed to do more than talk and vote. Gray, 39, who is a para-educator working with special-needs children for Fayette County schools, did something she had never done before: She filed to run for office. “This is a time when we need to make a difference,” said Gray, a Democrat running for state Senate in a district that includes Clark and Montgomery counties and part of Fayette. “We can’t continue to complain about a situation and not be willing to step up. I just had enough of complaining.” 2018-10-08T08:37:36-04:00

Kentucky man charged with murder in death of his wife’s grandfather

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
A Carter County man was arrested early Sunday on a charge of killing his wife’s grandfather. Matthew Dale Kelley, 28, of Olive Hill was being held in the Carter County Detention Center on a charge of murder. Kentucky State Police said Kelley allegedly shot Bradley Duncan, 81, after the two got into an argument, according to WKYT. 2018-10-08T08:30:08-04:00

‘He was the giant.’ Lexington banker who spearheaded Rupp Arena, legalized hemp dies at 92.

October 8, 2018 - 11:12am
Jake Graves, a longtime Lexington bank executive who helped get Rupp Arena built as the first chairman of the Lexington Civic Center board and later helped legitimize the Kentucky hemp industry, died Friday night. He was 92. Graves spent more than half a century heavily involved in Lexington groups, ranging from the Lexington Chamber of Commerce to the Kentucky Horse Park organizational committee to the Bluegrass Foundation. Most recently, he played an important role in the resurgence of Kentucky’s hemp industry. 2018-10-08T08:26:20-04:00

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