Kentucky Press News Service

Hopkinsville officer 'doing well' after being shot during pursuit; suspect still missing

February 18, 2019 - 2:39pm
Hopkinsville police officer Jeremy Davidson is "doing well" after being shot in the pursuit of a robbery suspect early Monday morning. According to a news release, the suspect has not been arrested as of 7:15 a.m. Monday. 2019-02-18T12:07:05-05:00

David Dooley murder retrial begins Monday

February 18, 2019 - 2:39pm
The second murder trial for David Dooley, a Burlington man accused of killing Michelle Mockbee in 2012, is set to begin on Monday. In 2014, Dooley was convicted of murdering Mockbee, a 42-year-old mother of two. Her battered body was found outside her office at Thermo Fischer Scientific in Boone County, where Dooley worked as a janitor. He has maintained his innocence despite his conviction and now he's getting a second chance with new evidence available to defense attorneys. Dooley was granted a new trial in 2017 after a complicated series of events involving the lead detective and county prosecutor. 2019-02-18T11:59:51-05:00

Man accused of pulling gun on couple wearing MAGA hats

February 18, 2019 - 2:39pm
A Tennessee man was arrested on suspicion of pulling a gun on a couple wearing “Make America Great Again” caps at Sam’s Club in Bowling Green. James M. Phillips, 57, of Cottontown, Tenn., was arrested Saturday by the Bowling Green Police Department on a felony count of first-degree wanton endangerment. Police were called to Sam’s Club regarding reports of a person with a gun, with multiple callers reporting that a man in a gray sweatshirt and “veteran’s hat” pulled a gun on a man and woman, according to Phillips’ arrest citation. 2019-02-18T11:56:33-05:00

Passport sues ‘surprised’ state over rate cuts

February 18, 2019 - 2:39pm
It seems there will be an impasse for Passport Health Plan and the state Cabinet for Health and Family Services. Passport Health filed a lawsuit in Franklin County Circuit Court “to protect our business and our almost 700 employees and to ensure our continued service to more than 310,000 Kentuckians,” the managed care organization confirmed in an email late Friday. The lawsuit, which names Secretary Adam Meier as a defendant, states that attempts to come to an agreement were unsuccessful, according to the Courier Journal, which first reported on the suit. 2019-02-18T11:54:00-05:00

Ramsey remains KRS trustee, two months after announcing resignation

February 18, 2019 - 2:39pm
Retirement Systems (KRS) at a board meeting in December, Neil Ramsey is still a board trustee of the state agency managing $12.3 billion of public pension assets. Following an Insider Louisville report in November about a possible conflict with state law regarding his service as both a KRS trustee and Anchorage city councilman, Ramsey announced at the board meeting on Dec. 17 that he would have to formally resign as a trustee because he could not continue to legally serve as both. Despite those comments, KRS spokesman Shawn Sparks told Insider on Thursday that Ramsey had not yet resigned and still remained a trustee, and he did not know if Ramsey had changed his mind and planned on staying. 2019-02-18T11:50:49-05:00

Louisville’s failed Amazon bid could be shielded under Kentucky bill

February 18, 2019 - 2:39pm
Louisville’s failed Amazon bid, along with other rejected offers and trade secrets, could be formally shielded under proposed changes to Kentucky’s open records laws. House Bill 387, filed Thursday by Rep. Jason Petrie (R-Elkton), would allow public agencies to exclude a variety of economic development-related subjects from responses to open records requests. Among the information that could be blocked from public view: Identities of shareholders, proposed but ultimately rejected economic incentives and companies interested in locating to another state. 2019-02-18T11:46:43-05:00

Kentucky House passes solar power bill, with changes that could lead to showdown

February 18, 2019 - 11:39am
The Kentucky House on Friday passed a controversial bill that could make residential rooftop solar panels less lucrative in the state, but only after adding new language that might lead to a battle with the Senate. Senate Bill 100, sponsored by state Sen. Brandon Smith, R-Hazard, would require the Kentucky Public Service Commission to determine how much solar customers would be compensated by utilities for selling their excess power back to the grid. The bill is backed by the state’s major electric utilities, including LG&E and Kentucky Utilities, who are currently required by state law to pay as much for accepting excess power onto the grid as they charge residential customers for taking power off the grid. 2019-02-18T11:36:12-05:00

So why was Ben Franklin famous? Kentuckians flunk test of U.S. history knowledge.

February 18, 2019 - 11:39am
If you know how many amendments there are to the U.S. Constitution, what Susan B. Anthony did and who said “Give me liberty or give me death,” you’re in a rare group in Kentucky. Only 1 percent of state residents surveyed scored an A on a test of American history knowledge, according to results released Friday. On the other end, 71 percent of Kentuckians made an F when answering 20 questions taken from the practice U.S. citizenship test, according to the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, which sponsored the survey. 2019-02-18T11:30:30-05:00

Kentucky's 1 of only 5 states to cut money for higher education this year

February 18, 2019 - 11:39am
Kentucky was one of only five states that slashed funding for higher education this fiscal year, putting more pressure on public universities to save money and raise revenue without overburdening students with skyrocketing tuition rates. The fallout from the 2008 recession hurt governments and public colleges across the country, but most states have finally stopped making cuts to the schools relying on their support, according to Grapevine, a joint project that involves Illinois State University and annually compiles data on states' higher education appropriations. In Kentucky, however, budget reductions have become the new normal for publicly funded schools like the University of Louisville and Eastern Kentucky University. 2019-02-18T11:16:33-05:00

Braidy wants $800M from US program that hasn't given a loan in 8 years

February 18, 2019 - 11:39am
To help pay for the construction of a highly anticipated aluminum rolling mill in Eastern Kentucky, Braidy Industries is asking to borrow up to $800 million from a federal program that hasn't issued a new loan in almost eight years. The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing direct loan program lends money to eligible businesses that make certain kinds of fuel-efficient cars or components for such vehicles. It gave out its first loan in 2009 to Ford Motor Co., which used some of the money to retool its assembly plant in Louisville. Braidy has applied to borrow up to $800 million through the ATVM program as it works to amass enough financing to build a $1.7 billion mill that is slated to supply automakers with lightweight sheet aluminum and help revitalize the economy in a jobs-starved corner of Kentucky. 2019-02-18T11:11:07-05:00

Trump's national emergency may halt a Kentucky military middle school

February 18, 2019 - 11:39am
A military project for a middle school at Fort Campbell Army post could be in limbo since President Donald Trump declared a national emergency Friday allowing him to reallocate funds for his proposed border wall. The $62 million project to construct Fort Campbell Middle School near the Tennessee/Kentucky border was one of the hundreds of military spending measures allocated in the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019. But the project could be on the chopping block. 2019-02-18T11:05:56-05:00

We can’t afford to be ‘fake news'

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
For every negative story we follow in the news, there’s a dozen more good stories. As readers, we pick and choose what we want to fixate on, and we get mad at anyone who has a different view than we do. Mainstream media such as CNN, Fox News and MSNBC make it easy to take sides. There’s a flavor of news for every interest it seems. At the end of the day, what issues directly affect you? Unless you work for the federal government, it’s likely the shutdown didn’t phase you. Yet, that’s where the MSM focused their attention for a month. 2019-02-15T13:51:51-05:00

Brayden’s moment a reminder that sports can teach us so much

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
They are rare, but there are fleeting teaching moments in sports that spill over into life lessons. It is not always the player with the most points or a slam dunk who steals the show. Sometimes the person you least expect makes the biggest impact. 2019-02-15T13:13:56-05:00

Transparency is needed in government

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
A proposed law requiring candidates for congressional offices in Kentucky to release their tax returns is another logical step to promoting full transparency in government. The law was proposed by former House Speaker Jeff Hoover, who was quoted by the Louisville Courier Journal saying, “Voters deserve to know where a candidate’s sources of income are, what business dealings that he or she may have and draw their own conclusions to who they have allegiances to.” The proposed bill would require candidates for constitutional office to provide at least their last three years of returns. 2019-02-15T13:07:57-05:00

A solar power grab. An obsolete coal plant. Here’s why politicians hold Kentucky back.

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
It is Kentucky’s recurring tragedy. So often, when this state had the opportunity to move forward, politicians fought to cling to the past because they were beholden to powerful economic interests of the present. This week, we are seeing two great examples of this. In both cases, Republican leaders want to block the kind of energy innovation taking place elsewhere and drag Kentucky back to the 20th century. 2019-02-15T13:01:51-05:00

Unvaccinated child brings measles to Kentucky after exposed outside U.S.

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
Measles has been confirmed in a child from southern Kentucky, the state Cabinet for Health and Family Services said Friday in a news release. The young child from Barren County had not been vaccinated and had traveled to an area outside the country where "measles is endemic," the health agency said. The country wasn't identified. 2019-02-15T12:43:33-05:00

Kentucky Southern Baptist leaders among hundreds accused of sex abuse

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
Six Kentucky men are among roughly 380 Southern Baptist church preachers and volunteers accused of sexual abuse and misconduct over the past 20 years, two newspapers have reported. The Kentuckians named include a pastor, an associate pastor and four youth ministers, according to a database compiled by the Houston Chronicle and San Antonio Express-News. There are 2,400 Southern Baptist churches in Kentucky. 2019-02-15T12:39:47-05:00

‘A sad day for ... justice system.’ Kentucky detective sentenced for lying in gruesome case

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
A former Kentucky State Police detective who admitted lying in court was sentenced Thursday to two years probation with eight months of that time on home incarceration. Charles J. Senters had entered a guilty plea in October to one federal count of making a false statement while under oath. U.S. District Judge Karen K. Caldwell handed down the sentence as recommended by federal prosecutors. “It is a sad day for everyone in our justice system when we see someone like you come into the courtroom,” Caldwell told Senters. 2019-02-15T12:35:28-05:00

Man sentenced to year for mother’s death

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
A Winchester man was sentenced to a year in prison after allowing his mother to die without calling for help, Jeffrey Wisecup, 28, pleaded guilty in January to reckless homicide for the death of his mother Sheila Wisecup last year. Thursday, he was sentenced, without comment, to the one year recommended in the plea agreement. 2019-02-15T12:26:23-05:00

Details emerge in Bell murder case

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
During last week’s court hearing where Tayveon Bibb plead guilty to first-degree facilitation to commit robbery, Bibb shed light on the events around the 2016 shooting death of Lexus Bell, according to a recording of the proceeding obtained by the News-Democrat & Leader. Bibb had to give an account of what he did to necessitate the robbery facilitation charge to Judge Tyler Gill and did so last Tuesday. 2019-02-15T12:23:23-05:00

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