Kentucky Press News Service

School cafeteria worker diagnosed with hepatitis A

December 5, 2018 - 1:49pm
A food service employee at John G. Carlisle Elementary School in Covington has been diagnosed with hepatitis A. The employee worked during a period of time when he or she was ill or infectious from Nov. 13 through Dec. 3. School officials have been notified of the case and are cooperating with the investigation and response activities, according to a news release from the Northern Kentucky Health Department. They've implemented enhanced disinfection steps within the cafeteria and restrooms to address surfaces that may have been contaminated. 2018-12-05T11:12:00-05:00

Lawmaker tries again to ban corporal punishment

December 5, 2018 - 1:49pm
Rep. Steve Riley, R-Glasgow, has once again proposed to end the practice of punishing schoolchildren with physical pain – a practice still used in 17 Kentucky school districts. Riley filed a bill for the 2019 legislative session that would remove corporal punishment as a form of discipline in all schools and church-related privately operated child-caring agencies or facilities. State law does not mandate the use of corporal punishment. Instead, school districts can individually determine policy. 2018-12-05T11:07:32-05:00

Simple step can save lives in fire

December 5, 2018 - 1:49pm
It’s getting colder, and that means we are trying to stay warm. But with colder weather comes the risk of fire, which is why local fire departments recently reminded people to take some commonsense steps to stay warm and safe. But there are some steps that are not so obvious to most people, including this year’s focus on “Close before you doze.” 2018-12-05T11:05:11-05:00

St. Catharine College sells for $2.4 million

December 5, 2018 - 1:49pm
Going once… going twice… going three times… Sold. The Walker Company, based out of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, was deemed the highest bidder in the St. Catharine College auction on Nov. 30. The winning bid came in at $2.4 million. 2018-12-05T11:02:43-05:00

Convicts, attorneys file lawsuit to halt work on Letcher prison

December 5, 2018 - 1:49pm
Lawyers from Pittsburgh and New Orleans, along with 21 federal convicts spread out in prisons across the United States, have filed suit against the government to stop the construction of a federal prison in Letcher County. The suit claims the U.S. Bureau of Prisons violated the law by failing to place documents concerning the prison construction in the libraries of federal prisons around the county so prisoners could read them and comment on them. It also claims the prison site is “toxic” and would endanger prisoners, while at the same time saying construction “would permanently degrade the already vulnerable environment. It requires clear-cutting over 120 acres of forest habitat for endangered bat species, excavating and grading an additional 59 acres, destroying three acres of wetlands, building an entirely new wastewater utility in the region, and emitting thousands of pounds of additional greenhouse gas emissions. 2018-12-05T10:51:39-05:00

Miners travel to Washington to fight for black lung fund

December 5, 2018 - 1:49pm
Retired coal miners and supporters from Letcher County and elsewhere in Appalachia were in Washington last week to urge lawmakers to extend a tax that benefits miners sick with black lung disease. The excise tax paid by coal companies funds the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund, but if Congress doesn’t act the tax will decrease by about 55 percent at the end of the year. Calling it a matter of life and death, supporters said the fund could be halved without the extension. 2018-12-05T10:48:48-05:00

Ideas for improving residents' well-being deserve long look

December 4, 2018 - 4:49pm
It was the type of email we receive hundreds of times each day, an attention-seeking blast from a public relations firm hoping for a free plug online and in print. It's easy to delete most of the junk messages, but this particular one late last month was hard to ignore given the subject line: "1/2 of Kentuckians would not walk a mile to get somewhere, study finds." The email, citing a survey by a tech product company, stated "54 percent of Kentucky adults … would not be prepared to walk a mile or more to get somewhere they wanted to go," and "on average, the longest Kentuckians would walk to get somewhere is 21 minutes." 2018-12-04T13:45:27-05:00

Police ID driver of Friday’s pursuit, officer-involved shooting

December 4, 2018 - 1:48pm
Frankfort Police have identified the driver who led law enforcement on an early-morning pursuit Friday. According to an arrest citation, Zindell Lindle, 38, of Frankfort, was pulled over by Officer Stephen Kyles after a vehicle registration search confirmed he was wanted on felony charges. 2018-12-04T13:41:26-05:00

Centre students show how to tackle drug epidemic

December 4, 2018 - 1:48pm
The drug epidemic hurting many local residents is no doubt the most important, most complicated problem facing us today. It affects individuals’ lives, as well as their families and their friends. It affects our schools, our health care system, our law enforcement officers, our justice system, our local governments and our tax rates. The scale alone is beyond almost anyone’s ability to comprehend, making it difficult to wrap your head around even basic questions like, “What exactly is the problem?” or “Will this new idea help?” But a scrappy group of Centre College students put their minds to the issue nonetheless this semester. After studying, researching, asking questions and questioning assumptions for months, they came away with some valuable insights. 2018-12-04T13:32:44-05:00

Boyd County jailer resigns

December 4, 2018 - 1:48pm
Boyd County Jailer Joe Burchett has resigned. William Hensley, who was elected jailer last month, will serve as interim jailer until his own term in office begins next month, the Ashland Daily Independent reports. Two inmates have died recently at the jail. This follows a series of questionable events at the county jail during the last two years. 2018-12-04T13:23:01-05:00

Alligator sighted in Ballard County

December 4, 2018 - 1:48pm
The bayou made its way to Ballard County as one local man found out when he spotted an alligator Friday. Chris Drummond said he spotted the animal while tending to waterfowl season preparations at Fallen Timber Farms, a hunting ground he and some partners run off of Sallie Crice Road in Barlow, near the Ohio River. Alligator sightings in this part of the country are uncommon but not unheard of, said Tony Dunker, a conservation officer with the Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife, in an interview with WPSD Local 6. The origin of the Ballard alligator is unknown. 2018-12-04T13:18:01-05:00

Paxton Media acquires 5 Kentucky newspapers

December 4, 2018 - 1:48pm
The Times Leader has joined the Paxton Media Group. The announcement was made to employees Friday as The Kentucky New Era Media Group made public the sale of its five newspapers to the Paducah-based company. In addition to The Princeton Times Leader, The New Era owned The Dawson Springs Progress, The Providence Journal-Enterprise and The Oak Grove Eagle Post. 2018-12-04T13:15:41-05:00

Radio host found dead

December 4, 2018 - 1:48pm
The body of a prominent Bay area radio host was found Sunday in a wooded area in Paducah, police said. Paducah Police said two teenagers found Ray Taliaferro’s body near South 25th Street and Brooks Stadium Drive on Sunday afternoon. Taliaferro, who had been reported missing to the Massac County, Illinois Sheriff’s Department, was reportedly last seen in the area of West End Baptist Church, not far from where his body was found. 2018-12-04T12:52:36-05:00

Feds award $88M extension at Paducah site

December 4, 2018 - 1:48pm
The U.S. Department of Energy has announced an $88 million contract extension with Swift & Staley Inc. for infrastructure support services at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The move extends an initial three-year base infrastructure services contract with Swift & Staley, for approximately $177 million, which began in December 2015 and expired Nov. 30, according to the DOE's Portsmith/Paducah Project Office. The 22-month extension runs from Dec. 1, 2018, through Sept. 30, 2020. 2018-12-04T12:46:22-05:00

Kentucky’s eight-year driver’s licenses could reduce organ donors

December 4, 2018 - 1:48pm
Kentucky’s coming switch from four-year driver’s licenses to eight-year driver’s licenses could have a negative effect on how many people sign up to become organ donors. That’s a concern recently expressed to state legislators by Shelley Snyder, executive director of the Kentucky Circuit Court Clerks’ Trust for Life. Right now, circuit court clerks ask about one million people a year if they’d like to register to be an organ donor, but that number could be “sliced in half” because people won’t need to renew their licenses so often, Snyder told a legislative committee in Frankfort recently. 2018-12-04T12:37:46-05:00

Man charged with Trigg County murder

December 4, 2018 - 1:48pm
A Hopkinsville man has been charged with murder in connection with the body police found in Trigg County Thursday. The body of Keith "Joey" Hayes Jr., 35, was found shot multiple times on Buffalo Road in Trigg County. According to a Kentucky State Police report, James W. Gentry, 43, Hopkinsville, has been charged with murder. 2018-12-04T12:34:40-05:00

Radcliff man recalls time with George H.W. Bush

December 4, 2018 - 1:48pm
The late George Herbert Wal­ker Bush, who was president from 1989 to 1993, is characterized by many for his kindness and generosity toward others, something Radcliff resident Tom Tiernan experienced first-hand. “He was a great person. He was a very good man,” Tiernan said. “He was always very kind and very gracious to everyone and that was his way to make everyone feel comfortable and included” Tiernan first met Bush, who died Friday at age 94, while Bush was campaigning for presidency in 1988. In 1997, when the opportunity arose for Tiernan to be a part of Bush’s first parachute jump in Yuma, Arizona, he said he jumped at it. 2018-12-04T12:22:53-05:00

Lincoln Museum planning 30-year celebration Thursday

December 4, 2018 - 1:48pm
To commemorate three decades of showcasing the 16th president’s history, the Lincoln Museum in Hod­gen­ville will hold a holiday reception event Thursday. Scheduled from 5 to 7 p.m. in the museum’s Community Room, the event includes a rare evening tour of the museum, live music and a short program. Museum director Iris LaRue said it is “unbelievable” the museum now is in its 30th year. 2018-12-04T12:20:50-05:00

Radcliff man receives 40 years for ‘senseless’ killing

December 4, 2018 - 1:48pm
Maria Williams was more than an older sister to Rosita and Samantha Velez — she was a close and trusting friend. “We were like two peas in a pod,” Samantha said Monday morning. “We were just alike.” Samantha was one of three family members to testify Monday during the sentencing phase of Brian Woods’ conviction for killing Williams in 2017 inside a home they leased in Radcliff. At one time, Woods and Williams had been engaged to be married, but the relationship ended about two weeks before her death. Woods, 35, who was found guilty Friday of killing Williams by a jury of seven women and five men, was sentenced Monday to 40 years in prison by the same jury. It took less than 90 minutes for the jury to sentence him. 2018-12-04T12:16:26-05:00

Mammoth Cave National Park working on new plan for managing wildfires

December 4, 2018 - 1:48pm
Mammoth Cave National Park is seeking public comments on its proposed fire management plan, which would allow the park to control burns that spring up unexpectedly in order to manage plant growth that might otherwise go unchecked. Tim Pinion, the park’s chief of science and resource management, said fires can occur naturally and can go a long way toward maintaining the environment. 2018-12-04T12:11:53-05:00

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