Kentucky Press News Service

Threat of ending Medicaid expansion looms in lawsuit

February 14, 2019 - 2:36pm
The possibility that Kentucky could pull the plug on Medicaid expansion is reiterated in a recent court filing by the state. The state is a defendant in a case that challenges the November 2018 reapproval of Kentucky HEALTH by the Trump administration filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C. In its filing seeking summary judgment, the state highlights the fact that Gov. Matt Bevin issued an executive order last year saying the state would terminate Medicaid expansion if a court blocked one or more components of the Kentucky HEALTH program. 2019-02-14T12:06:28-05:00

Kentucky lawmaker wants to legalize and tax sports betting to help pay for pensions

February 14, 2019 - 2:36pm
Kentucky could collect tens of millions of dollars in revenue annually and dedicate most of it to the public pension shortfall under a bill that would legalize and tax sports gambling, online poker and fantasy sports contests, a House committee heard Wednesday. But first, House Bill 175 must get the votes necessary to pass the House and Senate and overcome a possible veto from Gov. Matt Bevin, who opposes the state relying on new forms of gambling income. The sponsor — still making changes to the bill’s language — said he isn’t sure where it stands. 2019-02-14T12:02:05-05:00

'Dangerous’ or ‘common sense’? NRA pushes bill to allow concealed guns with no permit.

February 14, 2019 - 2:36pm
About 150 people decked out in red T-shirts that said “Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America” roamed the state Capitol this week advocating more gun control. State lawmakers, though, have a different idea: a Senate committee could consider a bill as soon as Thursday that would allow people to carry a concealed handgun without a permit or training. The National Rifle Association, which is pushing the so-called permitless carry bill, said the bill will give law-abiding gun owners the ability to better protect themselves and their loved ones. 2019-02-14T11:57:11-05:00

Paradise no more. TVA votes to close iconic coal-burning power plant in Kentucky.

February 14, 2019 - 2:36pm
In the end, not even a tweet from President Donald Trump could save an iconic coal-burning power plant in Western Kentucky. The Tennessee Valley Authority board voted Thursday to close the final burner at the Paradise coal-fired plant in Muhlenberg County by the end of 2020. Residents had warned that closing Unit 3 at the plant, which employs 131 people, would hurt the local economy and force people to move away for work, and Trump sent a tweet earlier this week urging TVA to consider all factors before voting to close viable power plants like Unit 3 at Paradise. 2019-02-14T11:48:24-05:00

Bill requires county notification of landfill violations

February 14, 2019 - 2:36pm
A couple of years ago, the Scott County Fiscal Court learned of state violations against Central Kentucky Landfill from a local citizen. “Even though we were the host county where the landfill was located, we were not notified,” said Magistrate David Livingston. “So, we contacted the Division of Waste Management for copies of the violations and we were told we’d have to file an open records request.” 61st District State Rep. Savannah Maddox has filed HB 222 that requires county fiscal courts to be notified regarding complaints, investigations and actions against any solid waste disposal facilities. 2019-02-14T11:40:55-05:00

Kentucky River running high

February 14, 2019 - 11:36am
While nowhere near flood stage, the Kentucky River was running high Wednesday following days of rainy weather and a record-setting amount of precipitation on Monday. According to the National Weather Service in Louisville, the river at the Frankfort lock was at 20.7 feet at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday and going down after cresting at 21.02 feet at 9:30 p.m. Tuesday. Flood stage is 31 feet. 2019-02-14T11:32:38-05:00

Valentine's Day couple celebrating 63rd wedding anniversary

February 14, 2019 - 11:36am
Larry and Betty Sue French’s love story started in the fall of 1952 at Western Kentucky University when the two met during registration. A little more than a year later on Nov. 14, 1953, the two Hardin County natives went on their first date. It was to a football game. Betty Sue said it was a sunny day and she wore a two-piece knit short-sleeve dress, high heels and nylons with seams in them. Fast forward a few years later, the couple tied the knot on Valentine’s Day 1956. Betty Sue was 22 and Larry was 23. Today, the two are celebrating their 63rd wedding anniversary and they still are Valentines. 2019-02-14T11:28:13-05:00

Economist: Kentucky has many positives

February 14, 2019 - 11:36am
When it comes to improving its economy, an economist said Kentucky and the Elizabethtown area have several advantages including a pro-business and low-tax environment. The state also is in a prime spot logistically, within a day’s drive of the rest of the southeast, Texas and the midwest. Augustine “Gus” Faucher, senior vice president of the PNC Financial Ser­vices Group, discussed several recent economic trends and what it means for the Eliza­­bethtown metropolitan area Wed­nesday morning at the headquarters of Nolin Rural Electric Co-op. 2019-02-14T11:23:55-05:00

Bishop clears Covington Catholic teens. Native man: 'Not up to white people to determine what is racist'

February 14, 2019 - 11:36am
The Diocese of Covington's investigation involving Covington Catholic students in Washington D.C. that went viral has concluded and found that the students did not "instigate the incident." On Wednesday, Bishop Rev. Roger Foys said his hopes had been realized in that the students were exonerated and that they "can move forward with their lives." Lance Soto, a local indigenous leader who lives in Covington, disagreed with the report's conclusion. He said the tomahawk chop is tied to some professional sport teams that use racist imagery like mascots to depict indigenous people. 2019-02-14T11:17:38-05:00

Murder suspects from Tennessee apprehended in Adair

February 14, 2019 - 11:36am
Two suspects in the murder of two Tennesseans Monday were apprehended in Adair County Tuesday evening. Law enforcement received a call at 5:05 p.m. Tuesday that shots had been fired from the window of a vehicle traveling toward Columbia on Ky. 55 south. Deputy Sheriff Brandon Hitch met a vehicle matching the description, a 1990s model S-10, on Ky 55 and attempted to initiate a traffic stop after turning onto Ky. 704. The vehicle continued for a short distance and pulled up to a barn at a private residence. Two male occupants then fled on foot. 2019-02-14T11:13:05-05:00

Death of Bowling Green man ruled homicide

February 14, 2019 - 11:36am
The death of a Bowling Green man whose body was found last week at a trucking company has been ruled a homicide. City police were called to Mega Transport, 263 Porter Pike, at 1:18 p.m. Friday in response to the report of someone injured at the location. 2019-02-14T11:07:42-05:00

Feb. 14 about more than Valentine’s

February 13, 2019 - 2:35pm
While many reserve Feb. 14 for romance and love, there is arguably a more notable recognition slated for Thursday. Feb. 14 also marks National Donor Day, a time to increase awareness about organ donation and the lives that can be saved. In the United States, more than 120,000 people are waiting for a life-saving organ donation. 2019-02-13T13:45:49-05:00

Honoring Lincoln’s legacy

February 13, 2019 - 2:35pm
If Abraham Lincoln were alive today, surely he would have deep continuing affection for LaRue County and the community of Hodgenville. But it’s likely “Honest Abe” would have these deep sentiments for reasons beyond the fact he spent a great deal of his childhood life growing up in a small one-room cabin on Sinking Spring Farm. The community, known for being Lincoln’s boyhood home, keeps Lincoln’s memory alive and well year after year with celebrations on his birthday. 2019-02-13T13:37:26-05:00

WKU registration policy change is common sense

February 13, 2019 - 2:35pm
When a public university accepts students’ tuition dollars, the least it can do is avoid making them jump through hoops just to get an education. That’s why we’re glad to see Western Kentucky University has grasped the obvious when it revised a registration policy last semester that barred students from signing up for spring classes if they had so much as a delinquent parking ticket. The WKU president called it a dumb business decision. 2019-02-13T13:33:22-05:00

'Cool' product: WKU students create wearable technology that heats and cools

February 13, 2019 - 2:35pm
Young entrepreneurs Liam Seymour and Jacob Haskamp of Bowling Green have a really cool product. Or maybe it’s totally hot. It sort of depends on the season. Seymour, who has studied computer science and electrical engineering at Western Kentucky University, and Haskamp, an entrepreneurship major at WKU, have melded their skills to create a company called BioTek Inc. and a product called AirBox that they hope will make life more comfortable for a host of customers. The two business partners, sitting in a coffee shop last week, demonstrated a prototype of the AirBox, which is basically a cellphone-size heating and cooling unit that attaches to clothing and circulates cool or hot air. 2019-02-13T13:22:52-05:00

Governor says he could support medical marijuana

February 13, 2019 - 2:35pm
Speaking in Stanford Tuesday, Gov. Matt Bevin said he could support a medical marijuana bill depending on the measure's language. Bevin told the audience that his teen-age nephew died of cancer and would have benefitted from medical marijuana's pain relief properties. His nephew was 14 and died in 2016. 2019-02-13T13:12:36-05:00

Circuit judge hears school shooting lawsuits

February 13, 2019 - 2:35pm
A pair of civil lawsuits connected to a deadly school shooting last year in Marshall County were heard for the first time in a courtroom Tuesday. The suits were filed by families of both of the students who died in the Jan. 23, 2018, incident at Marshall County High School in Draffenville, as well as several students who received injuries. The main item of business Tuesday was for Marshall Circuit Judge James T. Jameson to hear motions in the case. He did not set a new date. 2019-02-13T13:06:39-05:00

Prosecutor to seek death penalty in triple homicide

February 13, 2019 - 2:35pm
Commonwealth's Attorney Bruce Kuegel said Tuesday that he will seek the death penalty for Arnett B. Baines, who was indicted last week for murder in the shooting deaths of Jay Michael Sowders, Robert D. Smith and Christopher Carie, and an assault on Carmen Vanegas. But Kuegel said he is not seeking the ultimate penalty "at this time" for Cylar L. Shemwell, 31, who was also indicted on the same charges. Police said earlier that Baines, 30, is believed to have shot each of the three men in the head "execution-style." 2019-02-13T13:00:42-05:00

Mitch McConnell supports tentative deal to avoid government shutdown

February 13, 2019 - 2:35pm
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell gave the thumbs up to a tentative deal to avoid another federal government shutdown a day after trashing Democrats for their role in the negotiations. But the Kentucky Republican’s approval could be blunted by President Donald Trump, who said Tuesday that he isn’t pleased with the agreement. 2019-02-13T12:57:35-05:00

Ohio State student's abduction ends in Oldham County shooting. What we know

February 13, 2019 - 2:35pm
A student snatched Monday from a branch campus of Ohio State University and her suspected abductor were killed after a police chase ended in an Interstate 71 shooting in Oldham County, police said Tuesday. Skylar Williams, a 20-year-old student of Ohio State’s Mansfield branch campus about 275 miles north of Louisville, and Ty’rell Pounds, 24, died after being shot late Monday afternoon. Both were from Mansfield, which is between Columbus and Cleveland. Law enforcement and Ohio State officials said Williams had been abducted from campus late Monday morning. Pounds was named as a suspect. 2019-02-13T12:46:14-05:00

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