Kentucky Press News Service

So-called ‘flushable wipes’ pile up in Lexington sewers

January 17, 2019 - 2:15pm
Those “flushable” wipes you put down the toilet may have to be removed by hand from the city sewage equipment they clog. The cleansing cloths, dubbed “flushable wipes,” are marketed for post-toilet use but are typically not biodegradable. They do not dissolve like toilet paper does when flushed, and once in the sewer system, they can clump together and cause problems. It’s a mess Rod Chervus, the collections and conveyance manager for Lexington’s sanitary sewer department, has been dealing with for several years, and it’s getting worse. 2019-01-17T12:14:03-05:00

Republican lawmaker and candidate for governor denies sexual assault allegations

January 17, 2019 - 2:15pm
State Rep. Robert Goforth, a Republican candidate for governor, on Wednesday denied accusations of sexual assault made in an online petition and newspaper interview by a woman with whom he had a relationship a decade ago. The allegations describing two separate assaults in late 2008 and early 2009 were made in recent days by Alicia Whitaker, who first met Goforth when she lived near his family in Somerset. In a prepared statement Wednesday, Goforth said he was unmarried when he and Whitaker had “a brief, consensual relationship.” 2019-01-17T11:57:05-05:00

‘Flash freeze’ will turn rain to snow in Central Kentucky this weekend

January 17, 2019 - 2:15pm
A winter storm that could bring around two inches of precipitation will arrive in Central Kentucky early Saturday, according to the National Weather Service. It’s the second straight weekend the Lexington area will get a winter hit; 1 to 2 inches of snow fell last Saturday, according to weather service reports. Rain combines with uncharacteristically high temperatures Saturday morning, weather service meteorologist Ryan Sharp said. Temperatures will be in the 50s Saturday and areas in southern Kentucky could see highs in the 60s, he added. 2019-01-17T11:49:21-05:00

The shutdown in your backyard: 5 ways Kentucky has been affected

January 17, 2019 - 2:15pm
The partial government shutdown that started before Christmas is already the longest in U.S. history, and no one in Washington, D.C. — or Kentucky — is sure when it will end. Shuttered federal agencies have left hundreds of thousands of government employees across the country, including many in Kentucky, either stuck at home on furlough or forced to work without pay. There are five ways the ongoing shutdown is affecting Kentucky. 2019-01-17T11:43:36-05:00

Flash freeze? It'll be a really cold and wet weekend

January 17, 2019 - 2:15pm
Grab your rain boots and your winter coats: It's going to be a wet and cold weekend. Rain is expected Friday and Saturday and then temperatures are expected to drop drastically into the near single digits Sunday. Because temperatures are expected to drop so quickly, a flash freeze isn't out of the question, said National Weather Service Louisville Meteorologist Brian Schoettmer. 2019-01-17T11:38:32-05:00

McConnell doesn't have the guts to stand up to Trump and end shutdown

January 17, 2019 - 2:15pm
Mitch McConnell could use a lesson in leadership from Kentucky House Speaker David Osborne. While McConnell helps Czar Donald the Unpredictable keep part of the federal government shut down because he doesn’t want to cross the president, Osborne seems to understand the role of an independent legislature. “Republicans in the House are working diligently on this (pension) problem, I can assure you, but we will not rush to a vote,” Osborne said last week before the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce in what sounded like a rebuke to Gov. Matt Bevin, who pushed the legislature into a failed special session last month. 2019-01-17T11:31:22-05:00

KDE lobbyist out after sexual harassment allegation

January 17, 2019 - 2:15pm
Kentucky Department of Education’s director of government relations Brad Montell is no longer with the department after he was accused of sexual harassment, according to a department spokeswoman. Montell was one of several current or former Kentucky lawmakers named in a sexual harassment deposition focusing on Rep. Jeff Hoover. The Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting obtained and reported on a copy of the sealed deposition late Tuesday night, detailing the allegations. 2019-01-17T11:20:25-05:00

Louisville International Airport to be renamed in honor of Muhammad Ali

January 17, 2019 - 2:15pm
The Louisville Regional Airport Authority board will honor the city’s greatest son, as well as benefit from his name recognition, by renaming the airport, the Louisville Muhammad Ali International Airport. Following Ali’s passing in 2016, a question arose, said Jim Welch, chair of the airport authority board. “Is there a way we can both honor Ali and benefit from the extraordinary awareness and popularity of this figure?” 2019-01-17T11:15:50-05:00

Answer to wall impasse found in Reagan’s words

January 16, 2019 - 2:15pm
Among the speeches delivered by President Ronald Reagan, perhaps his most memorable was delivered in 1987. Standing at its Branden­burg Gate, Reagan called on former Soviet Union leader Mikhail Gorbachev to take down the Berlin Wall that had separated for nearly three decades communist-controlled East Berlin from democratic West Berlin. Drawing upon those earlier lessons from history, Trump and congressional leaders must end the current deadlock over a wall along our southern border. Reflecting on Reagan’s comments, they should better-serve all Americans, including those who could otherwise become contributing documented and taxpaying citizens, by looking beyond a wall to improve the gate to citizenship that is needed. 2019-01-16T13:46:53-05:00

Lawmakers should tax e-cigarettes

January 16, 2019 - 2:15pm
Politicians are always looking for something popular to support. And, most of them do want to make a positive difference in the lives of their constituents, especially children. So in a day and age where it seems increasingly difficult to find common ground, there is something lawmakers in Frankfort could do that would be supported by possibly three out of four Kentuckians. They could vote to tax e-cigarettes. 2019-01-16T13:43:27-05:00

Resolve to donate blood this month

January 16, 2019 - 2:15pm
Monday, the American Red Cross issued an emergency call for blood and platelet donors. According to a release from the charity, “With holiday scheduling keeping donors busy, the Red Cross collected about 27,000 fewer blood and platelet donations during the weeks of Christmas and New Year’s than needed.” Right now, the Red Cross is urging people across the country, especially type O, to schedule an appointment to give. The call comes at a fitting time, with January being National Blood Donor Month. 2019-01-16T13:41:05-05:00

Obit blaming Trump for hastening woman's death should have been published

January 16, 2019 - 2:15pm
When Frances Irene Finley Williams took her last breath on Nov. 21, her family wanted it known that, while Donald Trump didn’t kill her, he certainly accelerated her demise. An 87-year-old spitfire of a lady who had a voracious appetite for news and strong opinions about the direction of the country, she told her daughter about six months before her death, “If I die soon, all this Trump stuff has had an effect.” A couple of days before the obituary was to appear in the print edition of the Courier Journal, her son learned it had been rejected. He was told it could run, however, if the family removed the line about Trump. 2019-01-16T13:32:41-05:00

Miniature toys, momentous idea: Company signs to move into commerce park

January 16, 2019 - 2:15pm
Henry County natives, who made their living by owning a farm toy company, are bringing their successful business back home. Christopher and Alissa Burnett, owners of Burnett’s Farm Toys, signed an option agreement Jan. 9 with Henry County Fiscal Court to build a warehouse and showroom in the Henry County Commerce Park in Campbellsburg. The business operates now fully from the couple’s living room and primarily sells its products online and at 28-30 shows a year all over the United States, from the Midwest to Texas. Christopher thinks with the new building, he will be able to have much more room for storage and his house will become a home again. 2019-01-16T13:12:06-05:00

2018 one of the wettest years on record in Kentucky

January 16, 2019 - 2:15pm
The final results are in: 2018 was one of the wettest years on record in Kentucky and throughout much of the Midwest. Stations comprising the Kentucky Mesonet at WKU, the state’s official source of climatological observations, reported a statewide average of 63.08 inches of precipitation for the year. According to data available through the Midwestern Regional Climate Center, the record wettest year in Kentucky dating back to 1895 is 2011 with a statewide average of 64.35 inches. 2019-01-16T13:08:17-05:00

Man gets 10-year sentence in woman's death

January 16, 2019 - 2:15pm
A New Castle man accepted a plea bargain Thursday in Oldham Circuit Court in connection with the November 2015 death of Angela Hall. Bobby A. Long, 33, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of first-degree complicity to manslaughter, a 10-year sentence, and tampering with physical evidence, a five-year sentence during court presided by Circuit Judge Karen Conrad. Kentucky State Police officials said Hall was assaulted with a baseball bat in Trimble County. Her body was discovered in a shallow grave in a Shelby County field. 2019-01-16T13:03:43-05:00

Bystander killed while trying to escape store robbery in Knox County

January 16, 2019 - 2:15pm
A gunman shot and killed a bystander who tried to escape from a Knox County store during a robbery early Wednesday, according to Kentucky State Police. The shooting happened at the A & B Quick Stop on U.S 25E at Gray, which is near Corbin, at 12:05 a.m., police said. 2019-01-16T12:50:32-05:00

Hemp legalization brings new horizons for agriculture

January 16, 2019 - 2:15pm
A plant which was at one time a cornerstone of American agriculture will likely enjoy that notoriety again after being made legal by the passing of the most recent farm bill. On Dec. 12, Congress voted for an $867 billion farm bill with strong bipartisan support, which among many things, legalized the crop. Hemp has garnered a reputation of versatility through offering a range of viable uses ranging from fibers used in textiles to medicinal uses. Dr. Tony Brannon, dean of the Hutson School of Agriculture at Murray State University, has been on the frontline of research for the versatile crop, with MSU being one of the first institutions in the state and country to begin endeavors exploring its potential. 2019-01-16T12:44:46-05:00

Former Daviess sheriff's deputy charged with threatening to kill ex-wife and court officials

January 16, 2019 - 2:15pm
A former Daviess County Sheriff's Department deputy who has been jailed for several months for harassing his ex-wife now faces charges stemming from threatening to kill his ex-wife and court officials. Troy R. Calvert, 42, of Philpot, was charged Monday with two counts of retaliating against a witness in a legal process, which are class D felonies. Calvert was fired from the sheriff's department in 2017 after being charged with fourth-degree assault (domestic violence) for an incident against his then-estranged but now ex-wife, Tara Calvert, and for violating a domestic violence order she had taken out against him. 2019-01-16T12:40:02-05:00

Man killed at distillery identified

January 16, 2019 - 2:15pm
The man who was killed in a Monday afternoon work site accident at Owensboro's Glenmore Distillery has been identified.Daviess County Coroner Jeff Jones said Dennis Layman, 44, of Owensboro was the victim of the accident, which occurred about 1:20 p.m. Monday at the Glenmore facility on East Fourth Street. Jones said Layman was killed after falling off a suspended walkway. A medical examination done Tuesday morning in Madisonville determined the cause of death was blunt force trauma. Jones said he had no more information to release about the incident. 2019-01-16T12:36:12-05:00

'Political Pressure' & a ‘gentleman’s handshake’

January 16, 2019 - 2:15pm
The 2017 deal that led to the transfer of some of Southern Water District’s system to the Prestonsburg Utilities Commission in 2017 started because former Floyd County Judge-Executive Ben Hale wanted to get re-elected, the Kentucky Public Service Commission was told last week. That statement — alleged by several people who took the stand during a Jan. 8 hearing at the PSC — was among many allegations that have come to light during the review of an application for a Southern Water rate increase. Hale flatly denies the allegations, saying he was just trying to help Southern stay afloat and get sewer service along U.S. 23. 2019-01-16T12:25:51-05:00

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