Kentucky Press News Service

Adkins attacks Beshear's fundraising

November 21, 2018 - 1:42pm
State Rep. Rocky Adkins, the leader of the House Democrats in Frankfort who announced his candidacy to run for governor last week, stopped in Owensboro on Tuesday morning for part of a series of campaign visits throughout western Kentucky. Adkins, of Sandy Hook, enters a field that is already occupied by state Attorney General Andy Beshear, who announced his run for governor in July. Adkins said he wasn't worried that Beshear has a head start in fundraising, but he did think Beshear's fundraising hurt House Democrats going into the November election. 2018-11-21T12:09:22-05:00

Accused murderer enters plea for 40 years

November 21, 2018 - 1:42pm
A Murray man accused of murder in the August 2016 death of a Tennessee woman, as well as arson in a fire that destroyed a mobile home earlier that year, decided to end the defense of his case Tuesday. Christopher Lee Smith, 37, entered a guilty plea on both crimes Tuesday afternoon in front of Calloway Circuit Judge James T. Jameson. In doing so, Smith accepted a plea from the Calloway Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office for a 40-year prison sentence. 2018-11-21T12:05:58-05:00

Judge to ex-Louisville president James Ramsey: Pay your own court costs

November 21, 2018 - 1:42pm
The University of Louisville Foundation doesn't have to cover the legal fees former president James Ramsey racks up as he defends himself against the lawsuit it filed against him, a local judge ruled this month. Ramsey, who was forced to resign as president of the university and the foundation in 2016, wanted the foundation to pay his legal costs in advance since U of L's case against him is connected to his prior service for the nonprofit. 2018-11-21T11:59:51-05:00

Courier Journal named first woman managing editor, then dropped her

November 21, 2018 - 1:42pm
When Carol Sutton applied for a job at the Courier Journal in 1955, the only one offered to her was secretary, despite her stellar grades and recommendations from the University of Missouri. “You look damn good,” Executive Editor James Pope Sr. told her, she remembered decades later. She disregarded the sexist crack and took the job anyway. Nineteen years later, after toiling as a reporter and remaking the Courier’s women’s pages, she was named managing editor, the first woman to hold that post on a major American daily. But less than two years later, she was unceremoniously removed. 2018-11-21T11:41:04-05:00

Kentucky woman allegedly took nude photos of daughter, 4, for boyfriend. Judge refuses bond.

November 21, 2018 - 1:42pm
A Pikeville woman accused of making pornographic images of her 4-year-old daughter to share with her boyfriend has been ordered held without bond. Christina Brook Mitchell, 29, wanted to be released pending trial, but U.S. Magistrate Judge Edward B. Atkins ruled there was no set of bond conditions that would protect the public. 2018-11-21T11:31:35-05:00

Father charged with murder more than a year after man found dead in burned home

November 21, 2018 - 1:42pm
More than a year after a man was found dead inside a burned home in Knox County, police have arrested the man’s father in connection with his death. Charles Phipps, 33, of Kay Jay was found dead inside his home on May 11, 2017, according to Kentucky State Police. An autopsy showed he had injuries to his torso consistent with a gunshot wound. Paul Phipps, 60, of Barbourville was living next to Charles Phipps, his son, when the fire occurred, according to state police. 2018-11-21T11:28:29-05:00

Three CEOs in three years: Lexmark chief quits, citing “personal reasons”

November 21, 2018 - 1:42pm
Lexmark’s president and CEO resigned abruptly on Tuesday, just over a year after he took the helm of the Lexington-based company. Lexmark said in a news release that Rich Geruson had decided to resign “for personal reasons, effective immediately.” He also resigned from his position on the company’s board. Lexmark has now had three CEOS in three years. 2018-11-21T11:23:30-05:00

History teacher still in classroom after 45 years

November 21, 2018 - 1:42pm
Many people yearn for retirement from their jobs so much so that they spend years planning for it. But for Lonnie Lewis, 71, a history teacher at The Frankfort Christian Academy, retirement isn’t part of his plans. “I tell students all the time, I have for 20 years now, I’ll probably teach until I die,” Lewis said. “I hope I don’t die in my classroom, but if I do die in my classroom at least I die happy.” Lewis has been teaching history in Franklin County for over 45 years, including 33 at Franklin County High School. 2018-11-21T11:05:18-05:00

Emotions run high at murder sentencing

November 21, 2018 - 1:42pm
Donna Hudgins loved Anthony Gullotto as her own, saying he was more than a nephew. “Anthony was the son I never had,” she said Tuesday in Hardin Circuit Court as the man who shot and killed Gullotto 11 months ago was sentenced to 30 years in prison for his murder. As Hudgins spoke of the impact of Gullotto’s Dec. 19 death, followed by Carrie Taylor, another family member, Gullotto’s mother, Pat­ricia Gullotto, sat and sobbed. She often was unable to look in the direction of Austen Green, 21, of Elizabethtown, who stood about 20 feet from her and admitted to the killing. 2018-11-21T10:58:52-05:00

Kroger valuation case could have statewide impact

November 21, 2018 - 1:42pm
Property valuations might not sound like the most exciting thing to talk about. But attorney Stephen Dexter says “it’s easy to get passionate about” a property valuation case concerning the Danville Kroger. It’s a case that could have ramifications not just for all Boyle County property taxpayers, but for communities around Kentucky and the state budget, too, according to Dexter and other Boyle County officials. 2018-11-21T10:55:04-05:00

Hazy day? Blame smoke from California wildfires

November 21, 2018 - 1:42pm
The smoke from the California wildfires has drifted all the way to the East Coast, passing through Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. The smoke from the Camp Fire arrived in New York on Monday and has yet to clear out. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the smoke is still drifting through the Greater Cincinnati region. 2018-11-21T10:51:19-05:00

Kentucky’s Medicaid overhaul approved

November 21, 2018 - 1:42pm
Kentucky’s controversial overhaul of Medicaid has been approved by the federal government, the state Cabinet for Health and Family Services announced late Tuesday. The state’s Section 1115 waiver, also known as Kentucky HEALTH, was initially approved by the Trump Administration in January but was sent back to the federal government for further review as a result of litigation. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has now cleared the way for the program to begin as soon as April 1, according to a news release from the Cabinet. 2018-11-21T10:44:02-05:00

Egos must be set aside for jail reforms to be successful

November 20, 2018 - 4:41pm
Over the weekend, The Advocate-Messenger's In Focus article went in-depth on some of the recommendations from a recently released study of the local jail and criminal justice system. The article looked at what the issues identified in chapter two of the study actually look like in practice in the local circuit court. It also laid out some of the research behind the study’s recommendations for change and what some big names in Kentucky have said in recent months about criminal justice reform. The story got a lot of people talking; many opinions have been expressed both positive and negative. We’d like to address one opinion we’ve heard a lot. The general argument is along these lines: “These issues aren’t worth worrying about for the rest of us because the people stuck in jail committed crimes. If you don’t want to go to jail, don’t commit a crime.” 2018-11-20T13:39:31-05:00

Senator absurdly compares ICE to KKK

November 20, 2018 - 1:41pm
The Ku Klux Klan was, and continues to be, a very despicable group of people. For well over 100-plus years, members of this group, who hide behind white sheets on their faces, have peddled hatred and even murdered people simply because they were black, of a different ethnicity or because they were of a certain religion. The KKK is a horrible group of murderous people, and we believe that in no way whatsoever should it be compared to the lawful work of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. We, like most Americans, believe ICE does a very good job protecting our southern border, deporting illegal immigrants and doing a lot of other dangerous tasks. However, U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., apparently feels quite differently about ICE. 2018-11-20T13:34:53-05:00

Initiative will help college graduates

November 20, 2018 - 1:41pm
A new employability initiative launched at the state level will mean more Kentucky college graduates will be able to find and keep jobs. The Council on Postsecondary Education has partnered with six colleges and universities to launch the initiative, which is designed to make sure students who graduate from higher education programs have essential employability qualities including people skills, problem-solving abilities and professional strengths such as work ethic and technological agility. Those participating in the initiative include Bluegrass Community and Technical College, Gateway Community and Technical College, Jefferson Community and Technical College, Kentucky State University, Murray State University and the University of Kentucky. 2018-11-20T13:14:02-05:00

Adkins starts tour of state in Paducah

November 20, 2018 - 1:41pm
It didn't take state Rep. Rocky Adkins long to begin his campaign for governor, as the Democrat from Sandy Hook announced his candidacy on Wednesday in Morehead and kicked off a statewide tour Monday in Paducah. Adkins made the Laborers' International Union hall on South Third Street his first stop, traveling with running mate Stephanie Horne, a Louisville attorney who serves on the Jefferson County school board. About 50 people were on hand to meet the candidates. 2018-11-20T13:05:32-05:00

Anonymous donor brings gold coin to Salvation Army

November 20, 2018 - 1:41pm
A very special donor caught Capt. Aaron Abram of The Salvation Army of Owensboro by surprise Monday morning. The man brought in an 1834 $5 gold coin and told Abram he wanted to remain anonymous. "He said he was on his way to go sell it but felt God wanted him to donate it to us instead," Abram said. According to the Professional Coin Grading Service, the coin is valued at $800. 2018-11-20T12:58:22-05:00

Accident takes man’s life at construction site

November 20, 2018 - 1:41pm
One person died Monday morning in an accident at the construction site for the new DAE-IL automotive parts plant at Murray West Industrial Park, the Murray Police Department said. MPD Public Information Officer Sgt. Brant Shutt said the accident was reported at about 10:30 a.m. and that a fatality was involved, but he said he could not give details as to what happened. He did say, however, that MPD had opened a non-criminal death investigation. 2018-11-20T12:55:39-05:00

Thanksgiving gas, traffic, weather: What travelers must know

November 20, 2018 - 1:41pm
Thoughts of turkey and time with loved ones have everyone ready for Thanksgiving, but the holiday also brings travel headaches. While Kentucky may not be among the nation's busiest Thanksgiving travel destinations, here's what people hitting the road need to know to make sure their trip goes as easy as possible. 2018-11-20T12:42:48-05:00

Mom sues Texas Roadhouse after being told to cover up breastfeeding

November 20, 2018 - 1:41pm
A Louisville woman is suing Texas Roadhouse for "extreme and severe emotional distress" after a restaurant employee tried to cover up the child's face while her mother was breastfeeding. Sadie Durbin filed the lawsuit late Monday evening in Jefferson County Circuit Court. In the lawsuit, she recalled the Nov. 15 incident. Since 2006, Kentucky State law has protected a woman's right to breastfeed in public. 2018-11-20T12:27:26-05:00

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