Kentucky Press News Service

UPS workers say low starting pay, retirements causing lots of turnover as contract end nears

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
UPS package handlers said retirements and low starting pay are causing lots of turnover at the logistics giant’s Worldport in Louisville. A local Teamsters leader told Insider that the $10-per-hour starting wage for part-time UPS package handlers and the resulting turnover at the facility also are causing lots of stress for full-time workers. The union wants the logistics giant to raise the starting pay to $15 per hour. 2018-06-08T09:22:27-04:00

Laying down an ‘icon’

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
The historic sanctuary that was once home to Hopkinsville's Virginia Street Baptist Church is coming down. Crews have been working since the end of May to flatten the 126-year-old building, and the Rev. Dr. M.O. Fort believes it should take around 90 days to complete. The longtime pastor was careful not to call it “a demolition,” as he wanted to be sensitive to the connection his members and the community have to the church. Since Sept. 13, 2015, the congregation has worshipped right across the street in its new sanctuary. 2018-06-08T09:15:57-04:00

Trio of robbers hit Hancock Bank and Trust in Lewisport

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
Hancock Bank and Trust in Lewisport was robbed Thursday afternoon by three men who fled the scene with an undisclosed amount of cash. The Hancock County Sheriff's Department and the Kentucky State Police were investigating the incident, which occurred about 2 p.m. Thursday at the the bank on U.S. 60. "I have been sheriff 20 years, and we've never had a bank robbery," Hancock County Sheriff Dale Bozarth said. 2018-06-08T09:12:02-04:00

Free land offered to attract new business

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
The Paducah-McCracken County Industrial Development Authority on Thursday voted to make an offer to lure a major business to the area. The offer to be made to the unidentified business is 20 acres at the I-24 Park off Cairo Road, with an option for 20 more acres. 2018-06-08T09:08:21-04:00

Officials say explosive fire intentional

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
Susan D. Brady 61, was the victim in Wednesday’s house explosion at 806 Seminole Trail in Georgetown, said Scott County Coroner John Goble. An autopsy was held Thursday morning by the State Medical Examiner in Frankfort and Brady was identified through two tattoos on her shoulder with the help of a son, the coroner said. She died as a result of the fire, he said. A gun was found within feet of the body, but based upon autopsy results, it was not involved in her death, Goble said. The fire was intentional, said Georgetown Fire Department Chief John Ward and Captain Wes Broderick in a press conference Thursday. It is believed the fire was intentional, but the explosion was not, Ward said. 2018-06-08T09:04:07-04:00

Former KSP post commander in Frankfort among three indicted for forgery and theft

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
Two Kentucky State Police troopers, one a former commander at Post 12 and both with Frankfort ties, and the Scott County coroner were indicted Tuesday afternoon by a Scott County Circuit Court grand jury on forgery and theft charges. The charges stem from an internal investigation that alleges the men were involved in the theft of firearms and hundreds of cases of ammunition. 2018-06-08T09:00:01-04:00

Father, son part of 2003 Iraq invasion

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
Wayne and Cody Ray experienced firsthand the 2003 invasion of Iraq, which signaled the start of the Iraq War. Wayne joined the U.S. Army in 1969 and his son, Cody, joined the U.S. Marine Corps in 2000. Both were deployed in March 2003 to Iraq. “When we were first there, I thought it was pretty unique. You know, father and son being in Iraq at the same time. I bet you there were at least 500 father-and-son combinations or more in that entire operation,” Wayne said. “... When you think you are unique, you find out everyone else is unique, too.” 2018-06-08T08:56:18-04:00

Man run over during farm incident

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
A man was transported to Danville's Ephraim McDowell Regional Medical Center at about 1 p.m. Thursday afternoon from Gwinn Island Road after being run over by an attachment on a tractor. The man’s name was not available. Capt. Mike Rogers, with the Boyle County EMS, confirmed that the man had fallen off the tractor before being run over Thursday afternoon. He said he couldn’t provide any further information. 2018-06-08T08:53:50-04:00

NKY leader of white supremacist group killed in crash; Newport woman charged with murder

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
A Newport woman remains jailed and charged with murder in an alcohol-related crash that killed a former leader of a white supremacist organization in Northern Kentucky. Emily Sherry, 23, appeared in a Newport courtroom on Thursday for a preliminary hearing. Her blood-alcohol level was 0.422, more than five times the legal limit to drive, when her car struck another vehicle driven by Robert Ransdell, according to the citation written by Wilder Police. The April 21 crash happened eastbound on Interstate 275 in Wilder. 2018-06-08T08:49:16-04:00

Woman sentenced to 20 years in Logan murder case

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
A Logan County woman who admitted to her involvement in a home invasion that resulted in the death of another woman in her Russellville apartment was sentenced Thursday to 20 years in prison. Reba Kirk, 32, of Russellville was sentenced by Logan Circuit Judge Tyler Gill on charges of conspiracy to commit murder and complicity to first-degree robbery. Kirk was accused in connection with the Aug. 21, 2016, death of Lexus Bell, 21, who was shot while in her residence at Robinwood Apartments with a group of children she planned to take to a birthday party the next day. 2018-06-08T08:45:35-04:00

Italian court sides with WKU in Big Red lawsuit

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
It's been a long, strange trip for Ralph Carey, the inventor of Western Kentucky University mascot Big Red. When the WKU graduate first created Big Red in 1979, he couldn’t have predicted it would lead to a 15-year-old lawsuit against an Italian media company accused of copying WKU’s iconic mascot for one of its TV shows. But on Wednesday, Italy’s highest court published a decision recognizing the merits of Carey’s case. 2018-06-08T08:42:19-04:00

‘Stephen Foster Story’ returns Saturday for 60th season

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
It has been a year of uncertainty and challenge for the Stephen Foster Drama Association, but despite the state closing its stage just before Christmas, the community and Kentucky staple that is “The Stephen Foster Story” will return to its rightful home this weekend as the drama kicks off its 60th season. With fear of potentially missing out on the 60th year, drama, local and state officials teamed up to find a solution. While the amphitheater will need to be rebuilt come this fall, the drama was able to make repairs to the existing facility in order to open for the 2018 season. 2018-06-08T08:39:09-04:00

Group: Local art doesn’t reflect ‘us’

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
A city’s public art ought to reflect “us,” not “some of us,” according to an advisory committee formed in the wake of debate around Confederate statues. And, to accomplish that, Louisville city officials should occasionally review pieces in the public art collection to ensure they reflect “a shared version of our history,” the committee said. The group’s working draft on public art guidelines, published online Thursday, doesn’t advise city officials on what to do with specific statues nor does it control the fate of the John B. Castleman statue in Cherokee Triangle that’s been vandalized three times and cleaned once. 2018-06-08T08:35:16-04:00

Trump camp claims credit for new mill

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
The Trump administration says its policies on tariffs and taxes led to last week’s Braidy Industries groundbreaking for a $1.5 billion aluminum rolling mill in Eastern Kentucky, even though the project was in the works for more than a year. Trump announced new tariffs on aluminum imports in March after an investigation of possible national security risks posed by those kinds of imports. However, plans for the new plant in Kentucky were set in motion a year earlier, thanks in part to a direct Kentucky state tax investment and tax breaks. 2018-06-08T08:32:38-04:00

With truck production down, Ford offers OT

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
The halted production at the Kentucky Truck Plant in Louisville last month led to an estimated 13,600 fewer Super Duty vehicles rolling off the assembly lines. To make up for the loss, Ford Motor executives have offered overtime to hundreds of workers willing to pull extra time on Saturdays and Sundays. “We’re building them now,” said Todd Dunn, president of the United Auto Workers Local 862, said this week. 2018-06-08T08:26:14-04:00

Mother and boyfriend charged in boy’s abuse

June 8, 2018 - 11:24am
A Lawrenceburg mother and her boyfriend were indicted by a Franklin County grand jury after a drugged 3-year-old boy arrived at the Frankfort Regional Hospital with several injuries. The boy had bruises and bite marks and also tested positive for amphetamines and marijuana on May 14, according to Kentucky State Police. A partial outline of a handprint was also on the boy’s body, and he had very large pupils, police said. His mother, 36-year-old Dawn Baker, and his mom’s boyfriend, 35-year-old James Stratton, of Frankfort, were each indicted on criminal abuse and wanton endangerment charges, state police said. 2018-06-08T08:23:14-04:00

Judge to rule ‘as soon as possible’ in pension law dispute

June 8, 2018 - 8:24am
Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd said Thursday he will rule “as soon as possible” after hearing more than two hours of arguments about the controversial public pension law in a courtroom primarily packed with teachers. In arguing against the law, Attorney General Andy Beshear said he was representing 200,000 teachers, state workers and police officers in fighting against the law he said is unconstitutional. Steve Pitt, general counsel for Gov. Matt Bevin, disagreed and contended that the new law does not hurt anyone. 2018-06-08T08:18:01-04:00

Panel picks Herald-Leader building for new city hall

June 8, 2018 - 8:24am
A city committee has selected the Lexington Herald-Leader building as the site of a new government center to replace its aging downtown city buildings on Main Street. A committee of Lexington city employees chose the proposal by CRM Companies. That proposal is to gut and expand the Herald-Leader building at 100 Midland Avenue for a new city government building. Those plans include adding a multistory parking garage and an addition on the front of the building for a new police station. CRM Companies has an option to buy the Herald-Leader building. 2018-06-08T08:13:33-04:00

Ohio River may lose its regional water quality standards, vote suggests

June 7, 2018 - 5:23pm
An eight-state commission that oversees water quality along the Ohio River, the drinking water source for 5 million people, appears ready to strip itself of the power to set pollution-control standards for the 981-mile waterway. Six of eight states on the commission signaled in a preliminary vote Thursday that they'll go along with an industry-supported plan that would leave standard-setting authority to the individual states and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A final vote could come in October. 2018-06-07T15:07:40-04:00

Office of Kentucky Nature Preserves established

June 7, 2018 - 5:23pm
The Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet has announced that the Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission, the Kentucky Wild Rivers System and the Kentucky Heritage Land Conservation Fund will consolidate into the new Office of Kentucky Nature Preserves. Senate Bill 129, passed by the 2018 General Assembly and signed by Gov. Matt Bevin, created the new office, which is supported by the Kentucky Resources Council and other conservation groups. The change takes effect July 14, according to a state news release. 2018-06-07T14:45:28-04:00

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