Kentucky Press News Service

Congressman Yarmuth: Trump's use of national security for tariffs is 'bogus'

June 12, 2018 - 2:27pm
U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth said Monday he'd consider bipartisan legislation aimed at reining in President Donald Trump's authority to impose trade tariffs that are threatening to hammer Kentucky's bourbon industry. Yarmuth described Trump's use of a 1962 law citing national security for the tariffs on steel and aluminum as "totally bogus." The remarks in a phone interview from Washington come as the bourbon industry, in Kentucky and other states, has begun to plead for help from Congress and other policy makers after Mexico retaliated with a tariff against U.S. whiskey and the European Union has announced it would also impose levies on American spirits imports starting July 1. 2018-06-12T08:35:08-04:00

Sheriff doubts 2-year-old was in the woods entire time she was missing

June 12, 2018 - 2:27pm
The Bullitt County sheriff said Monday he believes there's more to the story about 2-year-old Charlee Campbell's disappearance. Charlee was found by a neighbor Saturday evening in the area that volunteer crews and officials had been searching since she went missing from her home in Lebanon Junction on Thursday morning. Bullitt County Sheriff Donnie Tinnell said Monday she's now in the care of Child Protective Services. 2018-06-12T08:30:53-04:00

Lebanon editor-publisher wins award for public service through community journalism in Ky.

June 12, 2018 - 2:27pm
Stevie Lowery, editor and publisher of The Lebanon Enterprise, is the 2018 winner of the Al Smith Award for public service through community journalism by a Kentuckian. Lowery will receive the award Oct. 18 in Lexington, at the annual Al Smith Awards Dinner of the University of Kentucky’s Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues and the Bluegrass Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, which co-sponsor the award, according to a news release. 2018-06-12T08:16:07-04:00

Economic development for God and county

June 12, 2018 - 2:27pm
A southern televangelist is making a plea for $54 million so he can spread the word of the Lord in a brand new, private jet plane. His begging for this excessive luxury is criminal and abusive. Sadly, some poor saps will give their last dollar so this clown can get a free ride. The beauty is, this is a free country and people can do crazy stuff like that and get away with it. Back here in reality, Pike County just announced that RCC Big Shoal will start repaying the loan and that money will go into the non-existent economic development fund. The occupational tax was supposed to go into that fund, but that didn’t happen. 2018-06-11T14:21:54-04:00

Fire continues to burn at Winchester recycling facility

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
A fire continues to burn after it broke out at Winchester's Stuff Recycling around 4 p.m. Saturday. Clark County Fire Department Chief Ernie Barnes said the fire is still in the extinguishing phase, so it is not clear what caused the fire. Barnes said the fire started at the bottom of a massive pile of old scrap metal. 2018-06-11T10:59:18-04:00

Good call on coal ash. State agency lets judge's ruling stand.

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
Kudos to the Bevin administration for not fighting at least one decision by Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd. The Energy and Environment Cabinet's decision not to appeal a ruling that Shepherd made earlier this year restores critical protections for the public against toxic waste from coal-fired power plants. Rather than try to defend an indefensible permitting change that had been dictated by electric utilities, Secretary Charles Snavely and the cabinet now are working with stakeholders — all stakeholders, not just the utilities — to update regulations in response to changes in federal law. 2018-06-11T10:24:28-04:00

In need of new ways to support Crusade

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
Without a doubt, the WHAS Crusade for Children is a remarkable event. Started in 1954, this rich tradition of caring has been embraced by the region as a means to demonstrate its love and support for children with health needs. No group has embraced it more enthusiastically than firefighters who raise money and account for 60 percent of the campaign’s donations. This year’s Hardin County total was $139,764.8 — off from last year’s record of $188,077. Many want to blame safety-minded individuals serving on city councils in Elizabethtown and Radcliff. Hardin County’s two largest communities no longer issue permits for roadblock collections — a primary tool behind the Crusade’s success. 2018-06-11T09:51:00-04:00

What is Trump thinking? Muhammad Ali doesn't need a stinkin' pardon

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
Some of the things that President Donald Trump has done have been mind-boggling, to say the least. His lies. His tweeting. His picking fights with our friends while he makes goo-goo eyes at Vladimir Putin and Kim Jong-un. But this idea of pardoning Muhammad Ali is, well, nutty. Especially since the Champ's conviction for refusing induction into the Army was overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1971. 2018-06-11T09:43:20-04:00

Mitch McConnell, trade tariffs will hammer Kentucky if you don't act

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
Where are you, Sen. Mitch McConnell? Kentucky needs you. What the Courier Journal warned about nearly a year ago is happening today: Bourbon is in the cross-hairs of an international trade battle, and the consequences could be dire for metro Louisville and the rest of the Bluegrass State. The high-stakes drama comes at a time when the bourbon business is booming — and profits are flowing in — across Kentucky. The state’s $8.5 billion bourbon industry alone generates 17,500 jobs and $800 million in payroll. There are 16 distilleries under construction or planned in the state, including the ambitious Kentucky Owl Distillery in Bardstown. In retaliation to President Donald Trump’s alarming plan to slap tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Mexico, Canada and the European Union, Mexico has imposed tariffs ranging from 15 percent to 25 percent against several U.S. imports, including 2018-06-11T09:38:03-04:00

Hemp processing project expanding, developer says

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
While nothing has changed on the site of a planned hemp processing plant in Carlisle County since a ceremonial groundbreaking in March, the developer says the project is still on - and growing. Local and state officials joined representatives of California-based Kings Royal Biotech and their Chinese investor partners March 15 in Bardwell to announce the project, which will process hemp grown in west Kentucky into pharmaceutical grade cannabidoil (CBD) isolate. 2018-06-11T09:24:58-04:00

State judiciary to examine ways to reduce pretrial incarceration

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
The Administrative Office of the Courts, which manages the state's judicial system, is embarking on an effort to reduce the number of people incarcerated in county jails while waiting for their cases to be resolved in court. The AOC's pretrial services division will become part of the "3DaysCount" initiative, which is a multi-state coalition with the goal of creating alternatives to jailing people before trial. The coalition is also looking at creating alternatives to the cash bail system that can keep a person behind bars simply because they can't pay, regardless of the charge. The group also is interested in creating a risk-assessment system that judges can use, instead of bail, to cut down the number of low-risk defendants in county jails. 2018-06-11T09:22:15-04:00

Lewis talks JCPS takeover, says ‘vulnerable kids ... underserved’

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
A state takeover of Jefferson County Public Schools is necessary because the district’s “most vulnerable kids continue to be undeserved and in some cases victimized,” interim Education Commissioner Wayne Lewis said. During a 30-minute interview, KET’s Renee Shaw pressed Lewis on his plan for JCPS, support for charter schools and backlash from the Jefferson County community. 2018-06-11T09:19:24-04:00

Korea summit hits close to home

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
A University of Louisville associate professor and her family in Seoul are among millions worldwide awaiting the historic meeting between President Donald Trump and Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Having grown up in Seoul and lived in the Louisville area for 27 years, Moon-he Baik understands what could be at stake for Americans, Koreans and the rest of the world when the two world leaders meet in Singapore on Tuesday (Monday at 9 p.m. EST). There’s no shortage of opinions about the first meeting between an American president and the North Korean leader. Many seem skeptical anything substantial will come out of it. 2018-06-11T09:12:23-04:00

Kentucky State Police investigating 2-year-old found dead inside car

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
Kentucky State Police are investigating the death of a 2-year-old who was left in a car in Crittenden. On Saturday around 6 p.m., detectives received a call of an unresponsive two-year-old inside of a Mercury Grand Marquis, according to a press release. The toddler was pronounced deceased at St Elizabeth Hospital, by the Grant County Coroner. An autopsy is pending. 2018-06-11T09:09:02-04:00

Accused killer Shayna Hubers marries Unique Taylor in jail

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
Accused killer Shayna Hubers, 27, got married Thursday in Campbell County's jail. Wedding bells rang at 2 p.m. Thursday for Hubers and transgender inmate Unique Taylor, who was previously known as Richard McBee. Hubers is accused of shooting 29-year-old Ryan Poston inside his Highland Heights apartment in 2012. 2018-06-11T08:58:32-04:00

School bus driver charged with sexual abuse of a student

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
A Bell County school bus driver on Friday was charged with sexual abuse, officials said Sunday night. Bell Central School officials contacted police reporting a sexual abuse complaint involving a school bus driver and student. An investigation revealed that David Deitsch, 68, of Calvin inappropriately touched a female student on different occasions. Deitsch was suspended by the Bell County School district after being made aware of the allegations and resigned as a bus driver. 2018-06-11T08:49:17-04:00

Chemical leak shuts down Lexington business

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
The Lexington Fire Department is working the scene of a reported ammonia leak at a Lexington business on Laco Drive. The chemical leak was reported about 6:05 a.m. The fire department's hazardous materials specialists were on site. WKYT reported the leak occurred at 3M-Ceradyne, and crews were trying to shut off the supply of the chemical at a building where it's stored. 2018-06-11T08:40:37-04:00

Career guidance website: Georgetown College leads the state in grads getting jobs

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
If you really want a job the best college from which to graduate is Georgetown College, according to this year’s survey on Zippia, a career-guidance site. Each year, Zippia releases a study listing the top schools in each state with the best record of getting their graduates jobs after they complete their degrees. Georgetown College posted a job placement rate of 92.54 percent. 2018-06-11T08:33:21-04:00

Former official's defamation lawsuit against KSU dismissed

June 11, 2018 - 11:27am
A court case in which the former chairwoman of the Kentucky State University Board of Regents sued the school, its current board chair and faculty members for defamation has been dismissed. On Thursday, Franklin Circuit Court Judge Thomas Wingate dismissed a lawsuit that alleged members of the KSU Faculty Senate started a campaign to have Karen Bearden removed as chairwoman by accusing her in electronic communications of being “engaged in an ‘inappropriate’ relationship with a former Kentucky State University President.” 2018-06-11T08:28:17-04:00

Storms, showers possible throughout the week

June 11, 2018 - 8:27am
The National Weather Service is calling for showers and thunderstorms through Monday night, with rainy and stormy conditions possible throughout the week. 2018-06-11T08:18:50-04:00

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