Kentucky Press News Service

Police: Grethel resident arrested for falsely reporting murders

July 3, 2019 - 12:11pm
A Floyd County man was arrested Friday afternoon after allegedly sending local law enforcement officers on a frantic “all units respond” call to find the shooter responsible for at least three murders at a home in Grethel. The Floyd County Sheriff’s Department arrested Jimmy Hall, 35, of Grethel, following the incident. He is charged with falsely reporting an incident and public intoxication (controlled substance). There were no murders in this case, however, and Floyd County Sheriff John Hunt said Hall was allegedly high on drugs. 2019-07-03T11:05:44-04:00

'Dead’ bear bites Letcher County man

July 3, 2019 - 12:11pm
An injured black bear bit a Letcher County man who found it lying in the road and thought it was dead, according to the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife. The incident happened about 1 p.m. Saturday in Cumberland. John Hast at Fish and Wildlife Resources in Frankfort said the bear had been hit by a car and its hind legs were paralyzed. “A good Samaritan, for whatever reason, tried to move it out of the road and it bit him,” Hast said. 2019-07-03T11:00:51-04:00

A cure rather than treatment

July 2, 2019 - 3:11pm
School shootings are one of the greatest tragedies unique to our time. Throughout most of humanity’s several millennia of existence, they did not exist. Today, they happen with such frequency we are all becoming numb. Law enforcement and first responders are continually improving their abilities to respond once an incident occurs, hopefully stopping murderous attackers before they can kill many more and getting victims treatment faster so more of them can survive. But no matter how fast they respond, police and EMS will always be a treatment for a symptom, not a cure for the disease. 2019-07-02T13:37:59-04:00

Bernie Sanders' plan to wipe out student loan debt isn't crazy. Here's why

July 2, 2019 - 3:11pm
I've never been rich. I didn't grow up that way. My dad was an accountant at City Hall. Mom was a transcript clerk at the Board of Education. My freshman year of high school, dad had a massive stroke and never worked again. But I grew up at a time when the state of Kentucky believed in higher education. It made it easy for a kid like me to go to school, get a degree and ultimately do what he wanted to do in life. 2019-07-02T13:20:46-04:00

Former UK star Lorenzen ‘is still very sick’ … but ‘remains a fighter’

July 2, 2019 - 3:11pm
Fabled Kentucky quarterback Jared Lorenzen remains “very sick” but his treatment has been effective since his hospitalization at the end of last week, according to a statement released Tuesday by his family. Roughly two years since making a public declaration that he intended to live a more healthy lifestyle and get his weight under control, Lorenzen was hospitalized Friday with multiple ailments that have him in intensive care. 2019-07-02T13:12:58-04:00

Kentucky elementary school principal dies in car crash, police say

July 2, 2019 - 3:11pm
An elementary school principal in Kentucky was among the people killed in a car crash Monday night, according to authorities. Jamie Gilliam, 38, was killed in the two-car crash about 9:30 p.m. Monday that took place near London, according to the Laurel County Coroner's Office. Gilliam was the principal at Johnson Elementary School in London. The coroner's office said James Dylan Johnson, 21, was also killed in the crash. 2019-07-02T13:06:45-04:00

Major Kentucky coal producer declares bankruptcy. 1,100 jobs at risk in three states.

July 2, 2019 - 3:11pm
One of the nation’s largest coal producers with mines in Eastern Kentucky filed for bankruptcy protection Monday, making it the second large coal company to do so in the past two weeks. Revelation Energy LLC., and its affiliate Blackjewel LLC., West Virginia-based companies that employ about 1,100 people in their Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia mines, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the Southern District of West Virginia, according to court documents. 2019-07-02T13:03:29-04:00

Youth tournaments bring new faces, business to area

July 2, 2019 - 3:11pm
In the parking lot of the Elizabethtown Sports Park on almost any day last week, cars carried license plates ranging from Texas to Missouri to Maryland as the sound of pings off aluminum bats and cheering crowds echoed from the park’s baseball diamonds. Since the Elizabethtown Sports Park began hosting the tournaments in 2013, the area has seen a substantial economic impact. According to the latest financial impact figures from 2017 via Sports Impacts LLC, it is estimated from tax collection data more than $4 million is spent locally by traveling teams, their coaches and families during these tournaments. 2019-07-02T12:57:30-04:00

Owensboro utility shuts down electric generating station early

July 2, 2019 - 3:11pm
The oldest and smallest of two Elmer Smith Station power production units in Owensboro shut down for good last month. According to Owensboro Municipal Utilities' officials, recent market conditions in the eastern United States lowered the wholesale price of coal-fired electricity. So, nearly a month before the unit was scheduled to close anyway and a year before the plant will be shuttered for good, that meant it was no longer economically feasible to continue running the 55-year-old, 164-megawatt boiler. 2019-07-02T12:51:41-04:00

Storm damage 'catastrophic' for farmer's McLean operation

July 2, 2019 - 3:11pm
The storm on Sunday night may have lasted less than an hour, but it was enough to do more than a half a million dollars in damage to some chicken houses in the Beech Grove area. Charles Moore, who owns the chicken houses in McLean County, said the storm came through about 9 p.m. Sunday. He said the winds with the thunderstorm collapsed the roofs on two chicken houses valued at about $250,000 each, and that's not counting the value of the chickens inside. 2019-07-02T12:46:00-04:00

Kentucky gets new laws on telehealth services, tobacco and pregnant workers

July 2, 2019 - 3:11pm
Medicaid recipients are among those who will benefit from expanded access to telehealth services for Kentuckians, beginning Monday, July 1. Passed by the General Assembly in 2018, Senate Bill 112 helps make it possible for patients to use video conferencing to consult with a provider while staying at home or accessing the service at a local health facility, according to the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services. Potential advantages include better access to physicians, especially for patients living in rural areas; reduced travel time and better management of chronic conditions, according to the Cabinet. 2019-07-02T12:37:23-04:00

Future is unknown for Jewish Hospital

July 2, 2019 - 3:11pm
The recent collapse of the University of Louisville’s bid to find a deep-pocketed partner to help buy Jewish Hospital only amplified fears over whether the century-old institution can keep its doors open. While Jewish has lost money, patients and doctors to better-heeled competitors in Louisville and beyond, the 462-bed hospital's chances of survival appear more fragile than ever as its owners push to unload it and as U of L has backed away. 2019-07-02T12:30:57-04:00

How do you honorably dispose of 25,000 US flags? Let them go out in a blaze of Old Glory

July 2, 2019 - 3:11pm
They flew for years — their stars and stripes soaked, sun-baked and frozen countless times outside homes on tree-lined streets, high above car dealerships and at government offices. But the roughly 25,000 tattered and faded U.S. flags — turned in to the American Legion by owners unsure of how to properly dispose of them — now lay packed on wooden pallets, soaked in diesel fuel and covered by a mammoth 50-foot flag on a rural Louisville farm. As the sun set Saturday, dozens of veterans whose service spread from World War II to Iraq watched silently as the edges of the funeral-like pyre of flags were lit. 2019-07-02T12:15:16-04:00

Man accused of sexually abusing teen, sending money

July 2, 2019 - 3:11pm
A Lexington man is facing multiple charges after a teen’s mother found inappropriate emails and large amounts of money that had been transferred to her son using PayPal, according to court records. The woman was looking through her son’s email for information about a project when she found multiple old and new inappropriate emails from 57-year-old Kenneth Brack Ecton, according to court records. 2019-07-02T12:11:56-04:00

KSU's new fermentation and distillation program could lead to diverse distilling industry

July 2, 2019 - 12:10pm
Kentucky State University will offer a new program that prepares students for work in distillation and fermentation industries this fall. The undergraduate certificate in Fermentation and Distillation Sciences will fall under KSU's College of Agriculture, Communities and the Environment. Students will not only learn about alcohol distillation and fermentation but also about fermented foods like kimchi, a Korean side dish of salted and fermented vegetables, and kombucha, a sweetened fermented black or green tea drink. 2019-07-02T11:57:58-04:00

Fort Knox welcomes new leadership

July 2, 2019 - 12:10pm
U.S. Army Human Re­sources Command at Fort Knox welcomed Monday a new commanding general as Maj. Gen. Jason Evans passed the unit colors to Maj. Gen. Joseph Calloway during a change of comm­and ceremony at the Lt. Gen. Timothy J. Maude Complex. Calloway comes to the command from the Pentagon, where he ser­ved as director of military per­son­nel management since April 2017. He previously served at HRC from December 2015 to March 2017 as the command’s director of officer personnel management. 2019-07-02T11:54:19-04:00

Pre-filed bill would make time stand still in Kentucky

July 2, 2019 - 12:10pm
Kentucky soon could join more than a dozen other states in the movement to make daylight saving time permanent. Legislation was pre-filed Monday by state Rep. Bart Rowland of Tomp­kinsville and Rep. Brandon Reed of Hod­gen­ville. The measure, BR 181, would make daylight saving time permanent throughout the commonwealth, but only if Congress first passes a federal law allowing states to observe daylight saving time year-round. 2019-07-02T11:50:24-04:00

Boyle supports plan to improve access to I-75

July 2, 2019 - 12:10pm
A planned upgrade for Ky. 52 could make it faster and easier to travel between Danville and Richmond. Boyle County Fiscal Court officially stated its support Friday for the project, which would construct a new connector road in Madison County. Madison County is applying for a grant to help speed along the project, which would widen Ky. 52 and realign it to connect with Duncannon Lane/Ky. 2872, providing direct access to Interstate 75 at Exit 83. The approximately $12 million project would build 6.8 miles of road and result in shorter travel distances and times between I-75 and Lancaster, according to information from Madison County Fiscal Court. 2019-07-02T11:47:22-04:00

Nick Sandmann in court for first time in $250M defamation suit against Washington Post

July 2, 2019 - 12:10pm
Nick Sandmann, a Covington Catholic student seeking more than three-quarters of $1 billion against several media companies, was in court for one of the pending lawsuits for the first time on Monday. Sandmann sat in a blue suit between his lawyers, L. Lin Wood and Todd McMurtry, as arguments were heard in a federal courtroom in Covington. Nick's first defamation suit was filed against The Washington Post. He seeks $250 million for the paper's coverage of a late-January incident on the Lincoln Memorial in which Sandmann and his classmates encountered a Native American group. 2019-07-02T11:39:31-04:00

Mammoth Cave National Park celebrates 78 years

July 2, 2019 - 12:10pm
Kentucky’s underground kingdom, Mammoth Cave National Park, celebrated its 78th birthday Monday. The world’s longest known cave system became the 27th national park in America on July 1, 1941, and park staff decided to throw a party for its anniversary. “Back in 1941 we only had 44 miles of cave discovered, now we have 412 known miles, so we’re here to celebrate that with some free community events,” Park Ranger Emily Sweet said. 2019-07-02T11:34:05-04:00

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