Kentucky Press News Service

Activist selected for state leadership role

November 1, 2018 - 8:26am
Elected as first vice president of the Democratic Woman’s Club of Kentucky, Hardin County political activist JoAnne Bland says the accomplishment is significant, not just because of the work and passion she put into earning it, but because she could not have done it a decade ago. Bland is the first transgender woman to become vice president of the organization. She also was chosen during the organization’s 91st conven­tion earlier this month as first associate director of the Demo­cratic Woman’s Club of Ken­tucky’s second district. 2018-11-01T08:04:59-04:00

And the winners are Paris and Owenton?

October 31, 2018 - 2:25pm
I’m seriously considering asking the governor’s office to stop emailing me news releases about economic development successes in other communities. I mean it. I received just in the past week or so a pair of news releases about economic development in other counties that totaled nearly $10 million in investments and somewhere in the neighborhood of 330 good jobs. Neither project was something that couldn’t have come right here, folks, not the least of which is an industrial hemp operation headed to Bourbon County. 2018-10-31T13:35:18-04:00

State health officials investigate two new hepatitis A-related deaths in Franklin County

October 31, 2018 - 2:25pm
The state's Department for Public Health is investigating two recent hepatitis A-related deaths in Franklin County. DPH declared a hepatitis A outbreak last year. Since Augustf 2017 more than 2,275 outbreak-associated cases of acute hepatitis A have been reported in 94 of Kentucky’s 120 counties. Hepatitis A has been a contributing factor in 16 deaths during this outbreak, including the two most recent deaths in Franklin County. 2018-10-31T13:14:08-04:00

Teacher arrested at school charged with alcohol intoxication

October 31, 2018 - 2:25pm
A Franklin County second-grade teacher at Collins Lane Elementary School who was arrested at the school Friday is facing charges after allegedly being intoxicated on the job. Tamatha Bradley, 46, was charged with alcohol intoxication, first and second offenses, a violation, and resisting arrest, a Class A misdemeanor. During an interview, the school resource officer reported that the teacher could not answer questions, repeated random incoherent sentences and was unsteady on her feet. She also refused sobriety and breath tests. Two years ago, Bradley was charged with DUI. 2018-10-31T13:01:36-04:00

Tech expert shares warnings and advice about social media

October 31, 2018 - 2:25pm
Stephen Smith, founder of A Wired Family, asks a simple question during his social media presentations: if someone offered you $10,000 a month to follow your child everywhere he or she goes 24 hours, seven days a week, would you accept the offer? He knows the answer to that question would be a resounding “no,” but he argues that parents who allow their children to use social media actually give companies about that amount when they allow them to load apps on their cell phones. 2018-10-31T12:55:05-04:00

Larry Dale Keeling, a ‘crusty’ columnist who explained Kentucky politics, dies at 71

October 31, 2018 - 2:25pm
Larry Dale Keeling, whose writings in the Lexington Herald-Leader for 41 years lambasted missteps of Kentucky politicians and lauded progressive government, died late Monday of lung cancer. He was 71. Keeling, who grew up in Willisburg in Washington County, wrote for the Herald-Leader from Sept. 27, 1974 to Nov. 7, 2015, when he retired. During his years at the paper, Keeling was a reporter, editorial writer and columnist. Known for his crusty comments in his columns and blogs, Keeling once wrote under the moniker “Kentucky Curmudgeon.” 2018-10-31T11:31:05-04:00

Four things we should do after last week

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
The events of the past week have been horrific, both in Kentucky and nationally: the pipe bombs, the Kroger killings, the synagogue mass shooting. As I have reflected on them over the weekend, in the midst of the swirl of both accusations and calls for “unity,” it seems to me that there are four things we should all do. 2018-10-31T11:16:49-04:00

Report: Race track decision delayed

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
A vote on whether to award an Oak Grove race track license to one of the three applicants who applied was delayed on Tuesday, according to a report from Daily Racing Form. The report states the commission will have 30 days to make a decision under the approved motion. It has had roughly that same amount of time to consider the applicants. A decision is expected before Thanksgiving. 2018-10-31T11:01:50-04:00

Industrial hemp processing business promises 150 new jobs in Owen

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
An industrial hemp processing business promises to bring 150 jobs to Owenton after recently taking possession of the former Itron building. Lilu’s Garden, a state-of-the-art hemp processing company specializing in the manufacturing of derivatives from industrial hemp, will be hiring warehouse and maintenance workers, drivers, manufacturing processors and engineers with salaries ranging from minimum wage to more than $100,000 per year, according to a press release. The company expects to be up and running as soon as next month and will hold job fairs to recruit and fill the positions in November and December. 2018-10-31T10:55:45-04:00

Floyd County resident faces elderly abuse charge

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
A Floyd County man was arrested recently for allegedly abusing his mother. According to the citation and arrest warrant filed in Floyd District Court, Gary L. Crum, 60, of Banner, was arrested on Oct. 20 and charged with three felony charges — knowingly abusing/neglecting an adult, second-degree burglary and theft by unlawful taking, as well as two misdemeanor charges — unauthorized use of a motor vehicle and third-degree criminal possession of a forged instrument. Floyd County Sheriff Sgt. Oliver Little said he started investigating the case after an elderly woman contacted adult protective services because she feared for her safety. She “had to check herself in a nursing home to feel safe,” the arrest warrant said. 2018-10-31T10:51:48-04:00

Trump could get the last laugh in the 2020 presidential election

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
I thought we were reliving the 1990s. Clintons. Trumps. Impeachment talk. We are still watching "The Simpsons" and Wolf Blitzer. But now I realize – we aren’t reliving the '90s, but rather a rerun of Barack Obama’s presidency. The president is polarizing, but not historically unpopular. President Donald Trump’s approval in the latest NBC News/Wall St. Journal poll (47 percent) was higher than Obama’s just before the 2010 midterm. In fact, Trump is in better shape than seven of the last 17 presidents at his first midterm, according to Aaron Blake of The Washington Post. 2018-10-31T10:32:39-04:00

Vietnam Wall squared away for Veterans Day

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
A crew of volunteers hosed down, soaped, rinsed and blew dry the replica Vietnam Memorial Wall on Tuesday morning to prepare it for Veterans Day. A ceremony to honor veterans is scheduled for 2 p.m. Nov. 11 at Elizabethtown Nature Park. For the first time, the ceremony will be held in front of the wall, which was installed earlier this year, said Terry Chaudoin, manager of the city’s parks and recreation department. 2018-10-31T09:25:22-04:00

This Kentucky college is the latest to split from Kentucky Baptist Convention

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
The University of the Cumberlands is splitting from the Kentucky Baptist Convention, the last Southern Baptist-affiliated general education school in Kentucky to give up financial support for more autonomy on campus. A major issue for the Williamsburg school is that under the current covenant between the two bodies, the convention picks all trustees on the school’s governing board. In 2015, Campbellsville University ended nearly $1 million a year in funding from the Kentucky Baptist Convention in order to get more flexibility over appointments and academic freedom, although officials said they remained committed to the state’s Baptist churches. In 2005, Georgetown College also left the convention. 2018-10-31T09:17:25-04:00

Paul Ryan talks taxes on the campaign trail for Andy Barr in Kentucky

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
U.S. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan didn’t talk about the upcoming election during a stop Tuesday in Georgetown, and he didn’t tell the assembled group of employees at the Toyota Tsusho America factory to get out and vote for U.S. Rep. Andy Barr, who was beside him. Instead, the man who has fostered a reputation of being a policy wonk talked about his signature piece of legislation while running the House of Representatives: tax reform. 2018-10-31T09:13:05-04:00

Andy Barr breaks with Trump over vow to end birthright citizenship

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
Hours after receiving a Twitter endorsement from President Donald Trump, U.S. Rep. Andy Barr broke step with the president over the citizenship rights of U.S.-born children whose parents are undocumented immigrants. In his latest appeal to his Republican base, Trump said Tuesday he would like to issue an executive order that ends the constitutionally-guaranteed right of citizenship for some people born in the United States. Barr said Trump does not have that authority. “The constitution is clear,” Barr said Tuesday after campaigning with House Speaker Paul Ryan at Toyota Tsusho in Georgetown. “The constitution cannot be changed by an executive order.” 2018-10-31T09:07:47-04:00

'Horrified' expo center leader wants to ban Nazi, KKK items from being sold

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
The Kentucky Expo Center said it will hold an "emergency meeting" to re-evaluate its policies after Nazi and KKK merchandise was sold at a recent event, prompting anger and outrage from Louisville residents. The merchandise was sold by vendors at the National Gun Day's annual firearm show this past weekend. The items included a white tank top with two red horizontal stripes and a patch on the chest featuring a black swastika; an authentic KKK robe used by the notorious white supremacy group; and holiday ornaments adorned with glittery swastikas. 2018-10-31T09:00:42-04:00

Where are the seasonal workers? Santa's helpers are expensive and hard to find

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
As he rushed down the aisle of the sprawling Louisville warehouse on a recent weekday morning, Paul Papoutsis spotted a large clump of workers streaming into the corridor ahead of him. The men and women, fresh off an early-morning break, ambled past bins of basketballs, athletic shoes and pro-team jerseys, and fanned out toward work stations — part of a force of 600 people at the e-commerce business where the temporary seasonal payroll is due to triple in coming weeks to handle the holiday onslaught. "We want to attract a great head count, [but] it's tough for businesses," said Papoutsis, director of operations at one of two Radial warehouses at Louisville's Riverport. "You have to ante up." 2018-10-31T08:54:35-04:00

Kentucky's tech czar enjoyed free housing — until we asked about it

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
Charles Grindle, Kentucky’s highly paid chief technology officer, was given 64 nights of free housing in the Old Governor’s Mansion and in a Governor’s Mansion cottage during his first four months on the job in late 2017 and early 2018. But it wasn’t until Oct. 19 of this year — nearly nine months after he moved out and 31 days after the Courier Journal asked about the arrangement — that Grindle paid the state $6,976 in rent. Pamela Trautner, spokeswoman for the Finance and Administration Cabinet, said Tuesday that she had no immediate explanation for the payment delay. In an email, she added that "After Mr. Grindle became a state employee, he was invoiced for his lodging at the Old Governor's and New Governor's Mansions, which he paid." 2018-10-31T08:47:01-04:00

Expungement expo taps into new job tool

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
Job seekers looking to get a fresh new start on employment received a wealth of information this week thanks to a unique job fair held by the Kentucky Career Center in Madisonville. As more employers require background checks on potential workers in addition to a traditional resume, many candidates with a criminal history feel they are left behind and find it increasingly difficult to find work, said Ruthann Padgett, vice president of operations at the Madisonville-Hopkins County Economic Development Corporation. 2018-10-31T08:39:00-04:00

Murray High alumna accuses former teacher of sexual grooming

October 31, 2018 - 11:25am
A Murray High School alumna claims that a former teacher engaged in inappropriate behavior and predatory grooming, and that school district administration failed to properly investigate. Last month, Kentucky State Police announced an ongoing investigation into a Murray High School teacher for what was described as “inappropriately talking” between the teacher, a current student and a former student. The Kentucky Education Professional Standards Board had launched its own investigation in 2013. 2018-10-31T08:25:35-04:00

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