Kentucky Press News Service

E’town toughens smoking ordinance

June 6, 2018 - 11:22am
Elizabethtown tightened its grip Mon­day on smoking in public places after the city council approved the addition of electronic cigarettes to its no-smoking ordinance. The first reading of the amendment to the ordinance, which passed in 2006, was May 21 — one week after Lincoln Trail District Health Department officials requested the council include e-cigarettes in the ordinance. 2018-06-06T08:26:43-04:00

Decomposed human remains found in south Lincoln County

June 6, 2018 - 11:22am
Authorities discovered human remains in southern Lincoln County early Tuesday morning. The body was too decomposed to determine identification or gender of the person, Lincoln County Coroner Farris Marcum said. The body has been taken to the state medical examiner’s office in Frankfort and an autopsy has been scheduled for Wednesday morning, Marcum said. 2018-06-06T08:24:24-04:00

Fast-moving fire destroys Latonia house undergoing renovations

June 6, 2018 - 11:22am
A two-story residence in Latonia is a "complete loss" after a fire caused it to collapse within minutes after it was reported around 1 a.m. Monday. Renovations were underway and the building was currently unoccupied, according to Assistant Fire Chief Chris Kiely of Covington Fire Department. 2018-06-06T08:19:27-04:00

Ohio River regional commission to vote on plan to reduce its role

June 6, 2018 - 11:22am
More than two dozen coal-fired power plants that line the Ohio River stand to get a break from a regional commission that has helped to dramatically improve water quality in the river, the drinking water source for five million people. Electric utilities and other industries are pressing a regional commission to end its role in restricting the dumping of toxic wastewater into the river, arguing there’s too much bureaucracy already. Instead, they want the commission to stick to research, and leave anything related to regulation to individual states. At the same time, the Trump administration has put on hold the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s first Clean Water Act rules in a generation to curb toxic wastewater discharges from power plants while the agency reconsiders them. 2018-06-05T14:21:57-04:00

Police: Mud-covered, bleeding man walks into stranger's home, helps self to milk

June 6, 2018 - 8:22am
A shirtless, bleeding man who reportedly walked into an apartment of people he did not know was arrested Friday by city police. According to a Bowling Green Police Department arrest report, officers responding to a call of unknown trouble around 7:30 a.m. Friday at an apartment learned from the residents that the man who had entered the apartment was still inside and was not wearing a shirt or shoes. One of the residents reported the man walked into the apartment through an unlocked front door and walked around inside the residence before retrieving a half-gallon bottle of milk from the kitchen and walking into a nearby closet with the bottle. 2018-06-06T08:14:51-04:00

Man sentenced to 12 years in death of late wife's caregiver

June 6, 2018 - 8:22am
Like most previous Thursdays, Omer Ahmetovic arrived at Fountain Square Church on March 2, 2017, for the weekly fellowship service. Court records indicate that Ahmetovic drove to the service almost directly from the office of naturopathic caregiver Juan Gonzalez, having just shot Gonzalez dead. Ahmetovic, 36, was sentenced to 12 years in prison on charges of second-degree manslaughter and tampering with physical evidence. 2018-06-06T08:10:38-04:00

Report highlights major local economic impact of immigrants

June 6, 2018 - 8:22am
A new study shows the broad economic impact immigrants have in the region, including paying more than $64 million in taxes and contributing $564.3 million to Warren County’s gross domestic product in 2016. Local officials said the report, unveiled Tuesday, will be the driver of strategies to better utilize the economic strength of the county's foreign-born populatio 2018-06-06T08:07:37-04:00

Echoes of the past

June 6, 2018 - 8:22am
In 2018, modern-day American society has its struggles, from the prolonged fight against terrorism to violence in our schools to providing affordable health care and many more issues. It might be understandable for this generation to think its members face issues more serious than any before it. But today marks the half-century mark of the assassination of U.S. Sen. Robert Kennedy. That generation had lived through the civil rights movement, the assassination of Kennedy’s brother, President Kennedy, and Martin Luther King Jr. and was mired in a war in Southeast Asia with no end in sight. The Kentucky Standard published an editorial on June 16, 1968, in the wake of Bobby Kennedy’s death. Much of its message still holds true today, 50 years later, and is republished here for a new generation to read and, hopefully, heed. 2018-06-06T08:02:32-04:00

Skimmer found on Elizabethtown bank’s ATM

June 5, 2018 - 5:22pm
Magnolia Bank on West Dixie Avenue is working with Elizabethtown police after a skimmer was located Sunday morning at the bank’s ATM. According to a Magnolia Bank Facebook post, customers whose card number may have been captured last weekend by the device would be contacted beginning Monday. Bank officials said they believed the number of customers impacted was small. 2018-06-05T15:40:14-04:00

McConnell cancels August Senate recess, leaving Democrats vulnerable

June 5, 2018 - 5:22pm
U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell is playing hardball. McConnell said Tuesday that he would cancel the August recess in order to force the Senate to negotiate a spending bill and confirm President Donald Trump's pile of nominees. It also hinders Democrats in the Senate from campaigning for reelection during the four-week break. 2018-06-05T15:21:50-04:00

Medicaid waiver implementation forum to be held in Covington Thursday

June 5, 2018 - 2:21pm
On July 1, Campbell County becomes the first county in Kentucky to require some Medicaid enrollees to participate in community engagement activities to keep their health care benefits. Enrollees, health care professionals and others interested in learning more about community engagement are encouraged to attend a state-hosted Stakeholder Advisory Forum at 1 p.m. EDT on Thursday, at the Radisson Hotel Cincinnati Riverfront, according to a state news release. 2018-06-05T14:02:17-04:00

BBB: Sweepstakes, lottery schemes devastate older victims with evolving tactics

June 5, 2018 - 2:21pm
Sweepstakes and prize scams bilked $117 million out of half a million North Americans in 2017, according to a new report by the Better Business Bureau). The fraud also concentrates on senior citizens, who also suffer the most losses' BBB news release said. Just recently, a Louisville man lost several thousand dollars in a fake lottery scam that apparently originated in Jamaica, WDRB reported. 2018-06-05T13:02:48-04:00

Iconic Lexington hardware store up for sale. After 43 years 'it's time,' owner says.

June 5, 2018 - 2:21pm
For more than four decades, Bill Edwards has helped customers find whatever they need: A hammer, a light bulb, a snow shovel, grass seed or just the right nut, bolt, nail or screw. Now, he needs a customer who wants to buy it all. The owner of Lexington’s last independent hardware store, Chevy Chase Hardware, has put the business up for sale. 2018-06-05T12:34:30-04:00

Schools’ duties don’t end with academic year’s calendar

June 5, 2018 - 2:21pm
Schools provide more than mental sustenance to the young children in our community. From literacy to nourishment, they serve many critical roles. That fact becomes particularly apparent during the summer. Learning loss is a problem with which many educators are well-acquainted. More important, students from many families may go without nutritional breakfasts, lunches or dinners. In severe cases, without the help of summer feeding programs, students may be forced to skip one or more meals. That’s why summer feeding programs are critical for our community’s children. 2018-06-05T12:25:46-04:00

Former Henry Clay High School basketball standout drowns in Tennessee lake

June 5, 2018 - 2:21pm
A 20-year-old former basketball player at Henry Clay High School and Asbury University, drowned Monday in Norris Lake in Campbell County, Tennessee, according to the county's sheriff's office. Jordan Houston was with his girlfriend's family swimming at the back of the boat around 1:30 p.m. Monday when he went under water and did not come back up, Lt. John Long said. The area where Houston was swimming is a popular area in the lake where boats congregate and people swim, Long said. The water is around 75 to 80 feet deep, Long added. 2018-06-05T12:18:26-04:00

Chandler Medicaid role sends the right message

June 5, 2018 - 2:21pm
A couple of news items from the past week come together we think to make a point. One was the Labor Department's monthly employment report, which was stellar. It showed continuing wage gains and strong jobs growth in every category of the economy. Unemployment dropped to 3.8 percent. That is the lowest since 2000 and before that, the 1960s. The other item came from closer to home. Republican Gov. Matt Bevin announced he has tapped former Democratic congressman and state attorney general Ben Chandler to help implement Bevin's new work/education program for able-bodied Medicaid recipients. 2018-06-05T12:14:21-04:00

Rev. William Barber, Poor People’s Campaign barred from Capitol

June 5, 2018 - 2:21pm
Monday in Frankfort, the KY Poor People’s Campaign held a large outdoor rally to denounce those who would take away healthcare, pollute the water and air, and practice systemic racism. But then, when they attempted to enter the Capitol to conclude the rally, they were turned away by state police. There were no legislators present Monday, as far as we could tell. The governor was not present either. But this movement continues to make an impression, and possibly to leave a spirit in the air that will affect all those who make laws and policy in Frankfort. Let us hope so. 2018-06-05T12:08:22-04:00

KSP blocks protestors from entering State Capitol

June 5, 2018 - 2:21pm
As a “Poor People’s Campaign” protest entered its fourth week, Kentucky State Police barred participants from entering the state Capitol on Monday afternoon. A few hundred protestors representing the “Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival” gathered at the foot of the Capitol’s front steps before trying to go inside around 3 p.m. Monday’s protests marked the fourth week that the group has rallied at the Capitol. KSP blocked the protesters from entering together and said two people at a time could enter the building. Lt. Joshua Lawson, of the KSP, said the new rule was put in place as a result of the campaign’s recent protests and hasn’t been used in other cases. 2018-06-05T12:03:15-04:00

Joining forces to honor Knox

June 5, 2018 - 2:21pm
To commemorate the 100th anniversary of its establishment, Fort Knox set out to recreate a photo taken by founders of Camp Knox. So the Brooks Field parade grounds were transformed into a photo studio complete with giant crane to capture roughly 2,300 people on film as they lined up to form the words Fort Knox. This highlight of the post’s commemorative centennial celebration serves as a material representation of how soldiers, Department of Defense civilian employees and community have been coming together for generations for the betterment of all. 2018-06-05T12:00:06-04:00

Pioneer Playhouse is a gem

June 5, 2018 - 2:21pm
This Friday, Pioneer Playhouse kicks off its 69th season of outdoor theater with “The Return of Tinker Doyle,” a play by award-winning local playwright Elizabeth Orndorff. We are lucky in Danville and Boyle County to have the playhouse, as well as the excellent West T. Hill Community Theatre. Both enterprises provide thoroughly enjoyable, high-quality productions you wouldn’t normally expect to have access to in a small-town, mostly rural setting like Boyle County. They are undoubtedly part of what makes this area a great place to live. 2018-06-05T11:54:15-04:00

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