Kentucky Press News Service

Forbes: Schnatter allegedly used N-word on conference call

July 11, 2018 - 2:55pm
Papa John’s founder and University of Louisville trustee John Schnatter is alleged to have used the N-word on a company conference call, according to a report by Forbes on Wednesday. Forbes reported that the conference call in May was arranged by Papa John’s executives and a marketing agency as a role-playing exercise for Schnatter to learn to avoid more public-relations problems, such as his remarks last year about NFL players protesting racism by kneeling during the national anthem. 2018-07-11T12:26:59-04:00

First, Casey man projects porn on his home; now, he allegedly strips, fights police

July 11, 2018 - 2:55pm
A Liberty man is facing numerous charges including DUI, second-degree disorderly conduct, menacing, resisting arrest and incident exposure after police arrested him on July 1. According to a police report, Jody K. Padgett, 41, of Liberty, was arrested after The Casey County 911 Center received a call on Kentucky 78 about a possible intoxicated subject sitting on an ATV. When police arrived, allegedly became very upset and started to attempt to fight the officer. He then went onto Kentucky 78 in the middle of the roadway, pulled his pants down exposing his genitals in front of a property owner and stated that he wanted to fight. This follows a June 3 incident in which police said Padgett was projecting porn on the outside of his residence. 2018-07-11T12:12:20-04:00

Playing games or developing addictions?

July 11, 2018 - 2:55pm
“Video games are the modern-day version of playing catch.” I read that quote recently, and while I hate to admit it, I know it’s true. I have a soon-to-be 12-year-old son. ‘Nough said, right? Many of our conversations revolve around the survival game called “Fortnite.” I’ll be honest, I didn’t really understand this game, initially, and still don’t entirely. But, the gist of it is a “Hunger Games” style battle and players fight to the death. Sounds super fun, right? 2018-07-11T12:00:10-04:00

Transport officer dragged 30 feet by escaping inmate

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
Martin County Sheriff John Kirk said Tuesday morning that part-time transport officer Larry Maynard escaped what could have been a fatal injury after an inmate attacked him and threw him from the vehicle Monday during an escape. Maynard was transporting an inmate from Inez to the Big Sandy Detention Center in Paintsville when he was attacked not far from the U.S. 23 and 645 intersection. 2018-07-11T11:44:44-04:00

Oldham County city council funds $25,000 investigation into mayor

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
The Prospect City Council has approved a $25,000 investigation into Mayor John Evans. In a special meeting July 9, the council passed a budget which would allow for the city’s reserves to be allocated for an investigation. The vote was 3-2. A list of allegations, which were distributed at the May 21 council meeting, included problems with the mayor’s memory, a misuse of Prospect funds to build a fence on private property and anti semitism, among other things. 2018-07-11T11:34:24-04:00

School board candidates scramble to comply with new transcript requirement

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
A new statewide requirement has would-be school board candidates praying that a dog didn’t eat their transcripts. Those wishing to serve on the boards of school districts must now show a transcript demonstrating completion of high school or the results of a high school equivalency exam before being allowed to run. The new requirement, part of Senate Bill 101 signed into law in April, is causing some confusion as the school board filing deadline approaches. 2018-07-11T11:28:02-04:00

School and health officials remind parents that students need new vaccinations before school starts

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
As students prepare to go back to school next month, parents will need to ensure vaccinations are up to date. All Kentucky students must start the hepatitis A and meningitis vaccines before returning to school this fall. The vaccines are required by a state law that went into effect July 1. 2018-07-11T11:24:03-04:00

Marshall superintendent says mental health the key issue in preventing school shootings

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
Fighting back tears, Marshall County Schools Superintendent Trent Lovett told a 10-member School Safety Working Group on Monday he had been in education for more than 30 years and had never experienced a more difficult day than Jan. 23. He was of course referring to the day alleged shooter Gabe Parker opened fire, killing two students and injuring 14 others. Lovett outlined the district’s response, both immediately following the shooting and in the months that followed. But Lovett said those, in his mind, were short-term fixes. He said the long-term solution to solving school shootings and other forms of school violence is to address mental health issues. 2018-07-11T10:58:09-04:00

Suspect enters Alford plea for murder charge

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
A Trimble County murder case that has traversed the Kentucky court system for four-and-a-half years is nearing a conclusion. Robert L. Baldwin III, 30, entered an Alford plea for a murder charge recently in Oldham County Circuit Court. In an Alford plea, the defendant does not admit guilt, but recognizes that the evidence indicates guilt if the case were to continue to a trial. Baldwin is accused in the murder of 24-year-old Angela Long. Long’s body was discovered by Kentucky State Police troopers in her father’s mobile home residence on Nov. 27, 2013 at 34 Kenlee Drive, south of Bedford. 2018-07-11T10:51:40-04:00

Kinship money still unavailable

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
With six grandchildren ages 1 through 14 to raise, Vicki and Dickie Dever do all they can to get by. Living on fixed incomes, the retired couple collect eggs from their chickens and slaughter cows and pigs raised on their 13-acre Bullitt County homestead to stock three deep freezers with meat. Dickie Dever grows vegetables in a big garden. But with virtually no assistance for the six children they’ve taken in at the request of state social services officials, Vicki Dever said it’s a struggle to survive. And she knows they’re among many Kentucky grandparents and other relatives raising children removed from homes because of abuse or neglect, a number rising steadily because of the opioid epidemic. 2018-07-11T10:02:08-04:00

Eat at home, McConnell, until you're ready to listen to all the people

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
Would someone bake a casserole for that man? Or get him enrolled in a “Meals on Wheels” program? If they don’t, I’m worried that U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is going to starve. Poor fella can’t go anywhere to eat these days without people showing up and reminding him of children who are stuck in cages while their parents fight deportation to other countries where they could be drafted to fight drug wars or killed. McConnell tried eating Saturday at the Bristol in the Highlands, a bastion of liberalism in Louisville, and was chased to his car by people chanting at him. 2018-07-11T09:44:05-04:00

I’m no Mitch McConnell fan, but let him eat in peace. There are smarter ways to resist.

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
Poor Mitch McConnell. Twice over the weekend, he was chased from restaurants in his hometown of Louisville by hecklers upset about the policies of his party and its president. I understand the hecklers’ frustration. Republicans have a lock on federal power, and they are doing a lot of terrible things: Abusing migrant children, undermining democracy, rigging the judiciary, damaging the environment, lying with impunity, mistreating America's allies, praising dictators and further enriching wealthy people and corporations at everyone else’s expense. But what these hecklers are doing is wrong. It is just as wrong as when Tea Party activists angry about health care reform heckled Democratic congressmen a few years ago. It also is counter-productive. Michelle Obama had the right idea: When they go low, we go high. That’s what good people do. 2018-07-11T09:39:37-04:00

Gov. Matt Bevin's 'disturbing' West End comments spark outrage

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
Gov. Matt Bevin said in a promotional video featuring the West Louisville chess club that some people might be surprised by the connection between the club and the neighborhoods it draws children from, unleashing a barrage of criticism on social media. "I'm going to go in and meet the members of the West Louisville Chess Club," Bevin said in the video. "Not something you necessarily would have thought of when you think of this section of town." 2018-07-11T09:23:54-04:00

Luke Hancock, ex-Louisville players to sue NCAA for vacated 2013 title

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
Former University of Louisville basketball players Luke Hancock and Tim Henderson confirmed they are among former Cardinals players who are going to sue the NCAA. The players, along with their attorneys, will hold a press conference Wednesday to announce an anti-NCAA suit "pertaining to its vacating of Louisville's 2012 and 2013 men's basketball seasons, including its 2013 championship," according to a press release. During an appearance on 93.9 FM in Louisville on Tuesday afternoon, Hancock said the lawsuit is a result of players being "fed up" with living with the NCAA's decision to vacate more than 100 wins as a result of the school's escort scandal. 2018-07-11T09:20:17-04:00

Video shows suspect wrestle armed Kentucky officer, then flee

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
The Jessamine County Sheriff’s Office is asking the public for help as they search for a man who is accused of assaulting a deputy as he tried to escape arrest. When found, James Gosser, 22, of Nicholasville will face charges of third-degree assault, resisting arrest and fleeing and evading police, according to the sheriff's office. 2018-07-11T09:15:11-04:00

Appointments at this Kentucky dental clinic down by half after Bevin’s Medicaid cuts

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
Dr. Misty Clark, a dentist who operates her own practice in Prestonsburg, pulled up her schedule Tuesday afternoon and shook her head. Her calendar showed five and a half hours of vacancies — an usual sight for Clark, who normally fills her schedule with as many as three patients an hour. But since last week, when Gov. Matt Bevin cut dental and vision coverage for about 460,000 low-income Kentuckians on Medicaid, more than half of Clark's patients have been turned away. Jessica Clark-Boyd, the office manager at Healthy Smiles Family and Cosmetic Dentistry, which Misty Clark operates, said the staff has rescheduled dozens of patients for appointments next month, hoping their insurance will be restored by then. 2018-07-11T09:09:15-04:00

Bevin administration relents. Kentucky Capitol opened to Poor People’s Campaign.

July 11, 2018 - 11:54am
After weeks of being denied access to the Kentucky Capitol, members of the Poor People's Campaign were allowed Tuesday to enter the statehouse together. "Thank you, attorney general, yes," said an elated Tayna Fogle of Lexington, an official with the state advocacy group for the poor, who danced as she entered the Capitol with about 40 others under the watchful eye of Kentucky State Police. The Bevin administration allowed the group to enter following an opinion earlier this month by Attorney General Andy Beshear that said the state had violated the law by allowing only two members of the Poor People's Campaign to enter the Capital at a time. 2018-07-11T09:03:29-04:00

Kentucky once had its own cave rescue story heard around the world

July 11, 2018 - 8:54am
The entrapment and rescue of 12 teenage Thai soccer players and their coach in a cave may seem like a novel or a suspense movie to much of the world, but to those familiar with Kentucky history, it is chillingly familiar. While they are safe, the situation is eerily like a caving accident that ended in tragedy in western Kentucky 88 years ago. 2018-07-11T08:47:40-04:00

Coal firms are Letcher County’s worst tax deadbeats

July 11, 2018 - 8:54am
Letcher County’s local government and two school systems lost huge chunks of their budget last year after the state of Kentucky cut the assessment of unmined minerals, and now they’re losing hundreds of thousands more as coal companies haven’t paid their remaining property taxes. At least one owes more than $300,000, and others have unpaid tax bills in the tens of thousands of dollars for 2017 alone. 2018-07-11T08:42:48-04:00

Couple gives out 5,000 mosquito nets on African mission trip

July 11, 2018 - 8:54am
Georgetown Fire Department Fire Marshal Tim Thompson and his wife Heather recently returned from a mission trip to Uganda, Africa. The couple previously adopted two sons, Moses, 17, and Micah, 10, from Uganda in 2011. They also have two biological daughters, Abby, 15, and Lily, 11. It has been the couple’s sixth time traveling to Uganda. Both of their sons had Malaria and when they were there adopting their sons they visited a village where there weren’t any mosquito nets. 2018-07-11T08:30:25-04:00

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