Kentucky Press News Service

Schools limiting distractions from smartphones

August 10, 2018 - 9:21am
The counselors deployed at Crittenden County Schools find smartphones to be the source of many problems for today's youth, and all three schools in the district have taken measures to reduce issues caused by phones. At both the middle and high schools, the school district has provided and assigned every student with a Chromebook for instructional technology. Similar devices are also made available at the elementary school, eliminating a need for phones being out in class. 2018-08-10T08:06:34-04:00

Meeting on future route of U.S. 641 set for Aug. 21

August 10, 2018 - 9:21am
The future of the second leg of a new U.S. 641 in Caldwell and Lyon counties could start coming into better focus later this month. The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has scheduled a public information meeting to update citizens on the selected route to widen and improve U.S. 641 between Fredonia and Eddyville, following several years of detailed study of the corridor. The meeting will be from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 21 at First Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Fredonia. 2018-08-10T08:02:34-04:00

Fire damages two buildings in Breathitt County

August 9, 2018 - 3:21pm
Two abandoned buildings on Armory Drive in Jackson have been damaged by fire. The blaze broke out about 7:30 a.m. Thursday, according to WLEX. A nearby church sustained water damage since firefighters had to hose it down to prevent the fire from spreading further. No injuries were reported. 2018-08-09T13:15:51-04:00

Lexington Qdoba manager nearly falls victim to costly scam until employees intervene

August 9, 2018 - 3:21pm
Quick-thinking employees of a Lexington restaurant prevented their manager from getting scammed out of more than $1,000. The night manager at Qdoba near Memorial Coliseum on Avenue of Champions received a phone call late Tuesday night from someone claiming to be from corporate, police said. The caller asked the manager to bring him money from the store safe and meet him at a nearby Walmart, according to Lexington Police Lt. Chris Van Brackel. Officers found the manager before he was able to deliver the money, police said. 2018-08-09T13:06:17-04:00

Man dies after lawn mower overturns at UPS in Lexington

August 9, 2018 - 3:21pm
A 50-year-old man died at University of Kentucky Chandler Hospital after he was involved in an accident involving a lawn mower at UPS Freight. Michael Vance sustained multiple traumatic injuries when the commercial lawnmower he was operating overturned and landed on top of him, according to Fayette County Coroner Gary Ginn. It’s not known how the accident occurred. The victim’s coworkers removed the mower before first responders arrived, WKYT reported. The fire department Tuesday said the equipment was a zero-turn mower. 2018-08-09T13:02:38-04:00

Metal tariffs bedevil iconic American firm

August 9, 2018 - 12:21pm
We have previously commented about the problem with using tariffs as negotiating tools. They are blunt instruments that frequently produce unintended consequences. An example comes this week from Alcoa, an iconic American brand that is the nation's largest producer of aluminum. Its metals are essential to producing everything from Boeing jetliners to cans of Coca-Cola. The Pittsburgh-based company operates production plants in the U.S. and Canada. Metal it produces in Canada and ships to the U.S. is subject to President Donald Trump's tariff on steel and aluminum imports despite the fact it is a U.S. company. A promise made by candidate Trump was that he would unleash the economic power of American manufacturing by freeing it from the burdens of overregulation. So what, pray tell, does one call the situation Alcoa is dealing with? 2018-08-09T11:34:47-04:00

Return of soldier's remains could bring family closure

August 9, 2018 - 12:21pm
It must be one of the worst feelings in the world to send a loved one off to fight in a war, only for them to never return home. Having a loved one killed in action would be one of the toughest things for a parent to endure. We have witnessed this through the many wars this country has been in. Brave soldiers have proudly served this nation in faraway lands and many of them have paid the ultimate price in doing so. In Kentucky, after decades of waiting, the family of Joe Elmore of Clinton County got the news that his remains have been found from the Korean War. 2018-08-09T11:30:25-04:00

Owensboro housing agencies adapt to HUD smoking ban

August 9, 2018 - 12:21pm
Some of Owensboro’s subsidized and low-income housing organizations have had to make adjustments as the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s ban on smoking in affiliated properties takes effect. In 2016, HUD made a final rule on its smoke-free policy in public housing and gave the country’s public housing authorities until July 31 of this year to put their own smoke-free policies in place. Shauna Boom, executive director of the Housing Authority of Owensboro, said the agency took advantage of their time to make the transition a smooth process and also got some help from an important partner in respiratory health issues. 2018-08-09T11:21:52-04:00

John Doe identified in Pike murder

August 9, 2018 - 12:21pm
A John Doe who was indicted with two Detroit men for a murder which occurred in the Green Meadow area of Pike County last month was named this week in a document modifying the indictment. Antwan Dorian Wilson, 22, and Coley Dundre Maxwell, 22, both of Detroit, Michigan, were each indicted on charges of murder and first-degree robbery and two counts of first-degree assault last month with a third man, identified at the time as John Doe. According to a filing from Pike Commonwealth’s Attorney Rick Bartley, John Doe has now been identified as Robert Lee Milton, 22, aka “Fat Rob.” 2018-08-09T10:53:12-04:00

Return to cronyism? State board sees no need for a national search for Kentucky education commissioner

August 9, 2018 - 12:21pm
Acknowledging that the fix is in — and always has been — might be the most above-board thing the Kentucky Board of Education has done since Gov. Matt Bevin stacked it with a majority of new members the day after the legislature adjourned in April. The new board immediately railroaded out Commissioner Stephen Pruitt and named Wayne Lewis as interim commissioner, violating the Kentucky Open Records Act in the process. Last week, state school board members said they’re not inclined to conduct a national search for a commissioner — a significant departure from the past — and that they just can’t imagine any other candidate would suit them as well as Lewis, a Bevin administration insider. 2018-08-09T10:39:29-04:00

Bear sighted in Muhlenberg and Ohio counties

August 9, 2018 - 9:21am
Last Friday, Isome Sapp was skimming through his trail cam footage on his farm for deer when he spotted something he initially thought was one of his cattle. "I thought, when I first went through it, that it was a calf," said Sapp on Tuesday. But after reviewing the images again, Sapp, who lives south of Greenville, realized he was looking at a bear. Sapp's video footage is the second sighting of a black bear in the area in about two weeks. The week before, a black bear was seen in Ohio County, said Scott McIntosh, Muhlenberg County's conservation officer for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife. 2018-08-09T09:16:29-04:00

Forest Service taking public ideas for LBL recreation plan

August 9, 2018 - 9:21am
The U.S. Forest Service is gathering public input as it seeks to develop a sustainable recreation plan at the Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area. In an effort to build the plan, Friends of Land Between the Lakes held a Forward to the Future public meeting Tuesday at the Joe Creason Community Center in Benton, one of two meetings in the LBL area. The sessions were intended to give the public an opportunity to share their thoughts, experiences and ideas for Land Between the Lakes for the next 10 to 15 years. 2018-08-09T09:10:46-04:00

Trump travel ban keeps Iranian woman from life-saving medical care in Louisville

August 9, 2018 - 9:21am
First came the headaches that would shake her awake at night. They rooted into the top of Marzieh Taheri's head and crawled down her forehead, pressing every bone in her face down to her jaw before reaching into her gut to churn up vomit. Then came the dizziness, blackouts and memory loss. A cure for her condition, radiation necrosis, long eluded neurologists worldwide. But Louisville's Dr. Shervin Dashti recently found what may be the first treatment that repairs the brain indefinitely without side effects. But saving Taheri is not up to Dashti. The decision is up to U.S. government officials operating a visa program that critics call a fraud. 2018-08-09T09:01:14-04:00

Mayor: Louisville will move statues that symbolize racism, bigotry

August 9, 2018 - 9:21am
Two controversial statues will be moved almost a year after activists called for the city of Louisville to take action. Mayor Greg Fischer announced Wednesday that Louisville will move the sculptures honoring John B. Castleman and George D. Prentice. "Moving the Castleman & Prentice statues does not erase history," Fischer said in a tweet Wednesday. "It allows us to examine our history in a new context that more accurately reflects the reality of the day, a time when the moral deprivation of slavery is clear." The two statues will be removed from their current locations by the end of the year, according to the mayor's office. 2018-08-09T08:54:58-04:00

Psychologist in Eric Conn’s disability scheme loses an appeal. He’s in prison until 2039.

August 9, 2018 - 9:21am
A federal appeals panel has upheld the conviction of a Pikeville psychologist who was charged alongside disbarred attorney Eric C. Conn in a massive disability-fraud case. The U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals issued its ruling against Alfred Bradley Adkins on Tuesday. Adkins, 47, is serving a 25-year sentence after being convicted of conspiracy, mail fraud, wire fraud and making false statements. Conn for years was one of the top federal disability attorneys in the country, securing Social Security benefits for thousands of people in Eastern Kentucky and elsewhere. 2018-08-09T08:47:18-04:00

Barrel by barrel. Here’s how a distillery is trying to save bourbon after warehouse collapse.

August 9, 2018 - 9:21am
How do you untangle a multistory pile of broken barrels and smashed staves to rescue the surviving bourbon? Very carefully. Since last month, Barton 1792 has been working to pluck one barrel after another from the pile formed when a barrel warehouse collapsed at the Bardstown distillery. The first half, with about 9,000 barrels, fell abruptly on June 22; the second half finally came down on July 4, with another 9,000 piling up. According to a video by Bob Mahanna, Barton safety director, first a large crane gently picks up a barrel and lowers it to the ground. A second crane moves it away from the pile and a Bobcat scoops it up and takes it to an inspector. 2018-08-09T08:42:21-04:00

West Virginia governor still owes millions needed by struggling Kentucky schools

August 9, 2018 - 9:21am
The billionaire governor of West Virginia said Monday that coal companies linked to his family have paid all the delinquent taxes they owe the state of West Virginia and its counties, but records show the companies still owe millions in Eastern Kentucky. According to records from county clerk offices, companies linked to Jim Justice owe more than $2.5 million across at least five Kentucky counties, some of which are struggling to fund schools and social services due to budgetary shortfalls. 2018-08-09T08:38:14-04:00

Company may shift production out of Louisville to overseas due to Trump tariffs

August 9, 2018 - 9:21am
The Switzerland-based chemicals producer Clariant announced at a community meeting on Wednesday that it might shift production overseas from its Louisville facilities because of uncertainty over new tariffs enacted by the Trump administration, according to the company spokeswoman. 2018-08-09T08:28:00-04:00

Louisville-area nonprofits grapple with sales tax expansion

August 9, 2018 - 9:21am
From the Kentucky Derby Museum to Dare to Care to the YMCA of Greater Louisville, many nonprofits are trying to adjust to a new reality — having to deal with sales tax. The expansion of the state’s 6 percent sales tax to include nonprofits took effect July 1, as the result of a larger tax reform effort by the Kentucky General Assembly earlier in the year, and has been a source of consternation for some nonprofits. “Every nonprofit around has been, ‘My gosh, how are we going to deal with this?’ ” said the Rev. Ron Loughry, executive director of Fern Creek/Highview United Ministries. 2018-08-09T08:23:36-04:00

Suspect in Georgetown beating death pleads not guilty

August 9, 2018 - 9:21am
The two people at the center of last week’s gruesome murder on Georgetown's Markham Drive were always kind and considerate, said the neighbor who alerted police. Including Hunter Moore, 36, the man who police say beat Denise Rene Hamilton, 53, to death with a baseball bat in order to remove demons. Moore was arraigned Tuesday. His attorney entered a plea of not guilty, indicating he would seek a psychiatric evaluation. His bond was set at $100,000. Morris’ next court appearance will be Aug. 14. 2018-08-09T08:15:23-04:00

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