Kentucky Press News Service

Build-A-Bear promotion made families wait hours – and then it closed

July 13, 2018 - 8:57am
Build-A-Bear's "Pay Your Age Day" was supposed to be all fun and games – sell some stuffed animals to kids who wanted them, lend a hand to families looking for a discount, and make a little money along the way. And then, Thursday came, and hundreds of children and adults showed up at once, hoping to cash in on luxury teddy bears that normally come with luxury price tags. The lines at Louisville’s lone Build-A-Bear shop were downright ... un-bear-able ... in the morning as kids and parents lined up around the block to take advantage of the unprecedented single-day promotion. 2018-07-13T08:28:22-04:00

Analysts: Papa John's better off without a key ingredient — the founder

July 13, 2018 - 8:57am
Analysts and brand specialists watching the furor surrounding Papa John's founder and now ex-chairman John Schnatter say the pizza chain's fortunes may take a turn for the better without Schnatter in the mix. His departure provides an opportunity for the Louisville-based company to chart a new course, unshackled from the bonds of a soured relationship with its creator, analysts said. The markets seemed to agree with that assessment. 2018-07-13T08:23:36-04:00

Kentucky golfer leaps in rankings with top 3 finish

July 12, 2018 - 2:57pm
Princeton native Emma Talley’s finish in a tie for third place at the Thornberry Creek LPGA Classic golf tournament this weekend gave her a big boost in the Rolex Women’s World Golf Rankings. Talley, in her rookie season on the LPGA Tour, entered the tournament ranked 357th in the world but now stands at 101st following her strong performance in the Thornberry tournament, held in Oneida, Wis. 2018-07-12T12:44:31-04:00

College freshmen urged to take 30 hours

July 12, 2018 - 2:57pm
The Council on Postsecondary Education is advising college freshmen to take at least 15 credit hours per semester in an effort to finish their degrees on time and efficiently. According to a report the CPE recently released, "Momentum and Student Success in Kentucky: The Power of 15 Credits," students who enroll in at least 15 credit hours their first semester of their first year are twice as likely to graduate on time. The report recommended several options to shorten the amount of time it takes for a student to complete their degree. 2018-07-12T12:34:31-04:00

Salyersville Independent goes back to kindergarten

July 12, 2018 - 2:57pm
On Friday last week, we had the honor of covering the North Magoffin Elementary’s Kindergarten Round-Up. Our composer, Erin Conley, and I rode with the incoming kindergartners on their first school bus ride through town, interviewed a couple kids about what they’re most excited about and talked to the teachers about the importance of “kinder camp.” As for the importance of the day, teacher Jeanie Howard told us she has been teaching for 16 years, but this is only the second year they’ve held kinder-camp. She said having this one day before school begins in August for the students to meet their teachers and get acclimated to the school setting, while still having their parents there for them, results in the first week of school going much smoother. 2018-07-12T12:26:58-04:00

Man killed by gunfire, another stabbed late Wednesday

July 12, 2018 - 11:57am
One man was shot and killed late Wednesday night, and another man was stabbed during a separate robbery a short distance from the deadly shooting. The Bowling Green Police Department was notified at 10:37 p.m. Wednesday that someone had been shot on Rock Creek Drive. Officers found Nevander S. Tardy, 27, of Bowling Green, in the area between. Tardy, who appeared to have suffered multiple gunshot wounds, was pronounced dead at the scene. His body was sent to Louisville for an autopsy. 2018-07-12T11:35:07-04:00

Coal miners’ lives still matter

July 12, 2018 - 11:57am
If you wonder why black lung disease is not just still killing coal miners but also making a roaring comeback, consider the criminal indictments announced in Owensboro on Wednesday. A now bankrupt coal company and eight of its managers conspired to cheat on dust monitoring tests and lied about the results in violation of federal law, according to the charges. Why did they cheat when they knew miners would be inhaling dangerous levels of the dust that causes black lung? Money, of course. 2018-07-12T11:27:55-04:00

Park’s addition proves unique interaction with economic development interests

July 12, 2018 - 11:57am
While Frankfort and Franklin County need commercial and residential development, it’s also important to preserve green spaces. An uncommon example of the manner in which those two goals can interact occurred last month when Frankfort Development Group LLC sold property to Josephine Sculpture Park, located in southern Franklin County, for $380,000 less than the value at which it was appraised. A majority of the $220,000 cost was funded through a loan, reporter Alfred Miller wrote in Tuesday’s State Journal. The difference is considered a tax-deductible gift from the development group. 2018-07-12T11:22:56-04:00

Universal income idea proves a flop in Finland

July 12, 2018 - 11:57am
Suppose you have a thirtyish son living at home. He refuses to look for work, sleeps until noon, plays video games all afternoon and then stays out all night, spending the allowance you provide him on booze and drugs. What's the problem here? Many counselors would say you are. Specifically you "enable" your child's dysfunction by continuing to support him despite his self-destructive behavior. Finland, a nation famous for cradle-to-grave social welfare, recently conducted an experiment. It paid $690 a month to 2,000 unemployed Finns aged 25 to 58. The program was supposed to be expanded this year to include working people. But instead the government pulled the plug. 2018-07-12T11:14:39-04:00

Book program symbolic of never-ending job for educators

July 12, 2018 - 11:57am
Because of recent events, there has been much talk about teachers — what kind of hours they put in, how much they deserve to be paid, pensions and everything in between. Regardless of opinions about pensions or pay, time and time again, local teachers and administrators make it clear that their job is much more than 176 school days with summers off. 2018-07-12T11:11:40-04:00

Legislators: Bevin’s dental, vision cuts ‘spiteful’ and ‘immorally wrong’

July 12, 2018 - 11:57am
Democratic leaders gathered at the Pikeville Public Library Tuesday for an event hosted by local representatives Chris Harris and Angie Hatton to address dental and vision cuts made by the Bevin administration. Harris said Tuesday that nearly 500,000 people lost vision and dental benefits as the result of a federal judge ruling against Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed Medicaid changes. “Just in my house district alone, the 93rd House District, which is all of Martin County and most of Pike County, dental and vision benefits are being stripped from thousands of people, over 10,000 people in Pike and Martin Counties alone,” said Harris. “That’s about 15 percent of the population of those two counties that will now be without dental or vision coverage.” 2018-07-12T11:03:02-04:00

Auditor: Agency that oversees courts is 'disorganized and unchecked'

July 12, 2018 - 11:57am
The agency that runs Kentucky's court system is "disorganized and unchecked" in many ways, a state audit reports. State Auditor Mike Harmon said at a news conference Thursday morning that the Administrative Office of the Courts "failed to follow many of its own policies and often simply didn't have sufficient policies in place to provide transparency and oversight." At the news conference, Harmon released what he said was the first ever comprehensive external examination of the Administrative Office of the Courts, or AOC. 2018-07-12T10:52:59-04:00

Woman shocked after state recalls license plate urging people to 'PRAY'

July 12, 2018 - 11:57am
When she went to get her license plate eight years ago, Lexington dentist Susi Burton wanted a tag that would be easy to remember and one that provided an uplifting message to the folks stuck in traffic behind her. She tried “PRAY” first, but it was taken. So was “PRAY1”, “PRAY2” and “PRAY3.” But she learned that “PRAY4” was free. So she was stunned the other day — no make that “horrified” — to get a letter from the State Transportation Cabinet telling her that she had 20 days to return her license plate to the Fayette County Clerk’s office or the state would cancel her 2016 Lexus’ registration. 2018-07-12T10:46:09-04:00

Private gun sales. Personalized julep cups. See what audit of Kentucky’s courts found.

July 12, 2018 - 11:57am
A lack of oversight among executives and elected officials in the Kentucky Court System has created a culture ripe for abuse, a report conducted by Auditor Mike Harmon's office found. "There is a perverse lack of accountability at the (Administrative Office of the Courts)," the audit says. The report, the first comprehensive external audit of the administrative arm of Kentucky's court system since it was founded in 1976, found several examples of "unchecked leadership" in the organization that led to a litany of problems ranging from the private sale of state firearms to the leasing of office space from a company owned by a Supreme Court Justice's sons. 2018-07-12T10:21:46-04:00

KSU’s educational boat tours quietly resume operations

July 12, 2018 - 11:57am
Kentucky State University’s free educational boat tours are back. The U.S. Department of Agriculture-funded vessel has resumed its usual June through October operations after mechanical troubles cut short its 2017 season. 2018-07-12T09:16:24-04:00

Guilty verdict reinstated for KY doctor accused of doing unneeded heart procedures

July 12, 2018 - 11:57am
A panel of federal judges has reinstated the criminal conviction of an Ashland physician accused of performing unnecessary heart procedures in order to run up profits. The appeals court decision left open the possibility that Richard E. Paulus, who retired after coming under investigation, could receive a new trial. For years, Paulus was a high-profile cardiologist at King’s Daughters Medical Center in Ashland, at one point leading the nation in the total amount billed to Medicare for heart procedures, according to a court record. 2018-07-12T09:09:22-04:00

Police chase on U.S. 27 ends in crash that kills two

July 12, 2018 - 11:57am
A police chase in Somerset ended Wednesday afternoon with a crash that killed two people, including an 18-year-old who had not been involved in the chase, according to state police. A Science Hill police officer had seen a man driving a 2007 Pontiac G6 recklessly and tried to pull him over, but the car did not stop, according to state police. The officer pursued the car, which was speeding south on U.S. 27, for several miles. 2018-07-12T09:02:20-04:00

Schnatter relinquishes role at Papa John’s, stocks rally

July 12, 2018 - 8:56am
In a late-night news release, Papa John’s announced that its founder John Schnatter was stepping away from the company. Schnatter resigned as chairman of Papa John’s board of directors hours after he resigned from the University of Louisville board of trustees following media reports that Schnatter used a racial slur on a company conference call. According to the release, Olivia Kirtley, a prominent local businesswoman and an accountant, will act as the Lead Independent Director for Papa John’s. 2018-07-12T08:49:41-04:00

73 years in the making

July 12, 2018 - 8:56am
A local military veteran has finally been issued the Purple Heart he earned while serving in World War II -- more than 70 years ago. Over the post-Independence Day weekend, staff at the Western Kentucky Veterans Center told former U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Dudley Riley that he had been selected to give a talk to grade-schoolers in Greenville on Wednesday. When Wednesday came, Riley stepped out of his room and into the hall, where he was surprised with applause from dozens of well wishers and dignitaries. There would be no trip to Muhlenberg County that day after all. Instead, Riley was going to be presented with the Purple Heart medal that had eluded him since 1945. 2018-07-12T08:34:51-04:00

Water main break fuels ingenuity, appreciation

July 12, 2018 - 8:56am
When it came time to bathe her kids Monday night, Audrey Sanders got creative. The Owensboro mother of two children had no running water. The few gallons she had on hand wouldn't do more than wet the bottom of her bathtub. So Sanders' ingenuity kicked in. Owensboro Municipal Utilities' water main break Monday morning caused a large portion of the city to go dry Monday morning. The water outage continued through Tuesday afternoon. 2018-07-12T08:30:04-04:00

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