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Braidy wants $800M from US program that hasn't given a loan in 8 years

3 hours 36 min ago
To help pay for the construction of a highly anticipated aluminum rolling mill in Eastern Kentucky, Braidy Industries is asking to borrow up to $800 million from a federal program that hasn't issued a new loan in almost eight years. The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing direct loan program lends money to eligible businesses that make certain kinds of fuel-efficient cars or components for such vehicles. It gave out its first loan in 2009 to Ford Motor Co., which used some of the money to retool its assembly plant in Louisville. Braidy has applied to borrow up to $800 million through the ATVM program as it works to amass enough financing to build a $1.7 billion mill that is slated to supply automakers with lightweight sheet aluminum and help revitalize the economy in a jobs-starved corner of Kentucky. 2019-02-18T11:11:07-05:00

Trump's national emergency may halt a Kentucky military middle school

3 hours 36 min ago
A military project for a middle school at Fort Campbell Army post could be in limbo since President Donald Trump declared a national emergency Friday allowing him to reallocate funds for his proposed border wall. The $62 million project to construct Fort Campbell Middle School near the Tennessee/Kentucky border was one of the hundreds of military spending measures allocated in the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019. But the project could be on the chopping block. 2019-02-18T11:05:56-05:00

We can’t afford to be ‘fake news'

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
For every negative story we follow in the news, there’s a dozen more good stories. As readers, we pick and choose what we want to fixate on, and we get mad at anyone who has a different view than we do. Mainstream media such as CNN, Fox News and MSNBC make it easy to take sides. There’s a flavor of news for every interest it seems. At the end of the day, what issues directly affect you? Unless you work for the federal government, it’s likely the shutdown didn’t phase you. Yet, that’s where the MSM focused their attention for a month. 2019-02-15T13:51:51-05:00

Brayden’s moment a reminder that sports can teach us so much

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
They are rare, but there are fleeting teaching moments in sports that spill over into life lessons. It is not always the player with the most points or a slam dunk who steals the show. Sometimes the person you least expect makes the biggest impact. 2019-02-15T13:13:56-05:00

Transparency is needed in government

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
A proposed law requiring candidates for congressional offices in Kentucky to release their tax returns is another logical step to promoting full transparency in government. The law was proposed by former House Speaker Jeff Hoover, who was quoted by the Louisville Courier Journal saying, “Voters deserve to know where a candidate’s sources of income are, what business dealings that he or she may have and draw their own conclusions to who they have allegiances to.” The proposed bill would require candidates for constitutional office to provide at least their last three years of returns. 2019-02-15T13:07:57-05:00

A solar power grab. An obsolete coal plant. Here’s why politicians hold Kentucky back.

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
It is Kentucky’s recurring tragedy. So often, when this state had the opportunity to move forward, politicians fought to cling to the past because they were beholden to powerful economic interests of the present. This week, we are seeing two great examples of this. In both cases, Republican leaders want to block the kind of energy innovation taking place elsewhere and drag Kentucky back to the 20th century. 2019-02-15T13:01:51-05:00

Unvaccinated child brings measles to Kentucky after exposed outside U.S.

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
Measles has been confirmed in a child from southern Kentucky, the state Cabinet for Health and Family Services said Friday in a news release. The young child from Barren County had not been vaccinated and had traveled to an area outside the country where "measles is endemic," the health agency said. The country wasn't identified. 2019-02-15T12:43:33-05:00

Kentucky Southern Baptist leaders among hundreds accused of sex abuse

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
Six Kentucky men are among roughly 380 Southern Baptist church preachers and volunteers accused of sexual abuse and misconduct over the past 20 years, two newspapers have reported. The Kentuckians named include a pastor, an associate pastor and four youth ministers, according to a database compiled by the Houston Chronicle and San Antonio Express-News. There are 2,400 Southern Baptist churches in Kentucky. 2019-02-15T12:39:47-05:00

‘A sad day for ... justice system.’ Kentucky detective sentenced for lying in gruesome case

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
A former Kentucky State Police detective who admitted lying in court was sentenced Thursday to two years probation with eight months of that time on home incarceration. Charles J. Senters had entered a guilty plea in October to one federal count of making a false statement while under oath. U.S. District Judge Karen K. Caldwell handed down the sentence as recommended by federal prosecutors. “It is a sad day for everyone in our justice system when we see someone like you come into the courtroom,” Caldwell told Senters. 2019-02-15T12:35:28-05:00

Man sentenced to year for mother’s death

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
A Winchester man was sentenced to a year in prison after allowing his mother to die without calling for help, Jeffrey Wisecup, 28, pleaded guilty in January to reckless homicide for the death of his mother Sheila Wisecup last year. Thursday, he was sentenced, without comment, to the one year recommended in the plea agreement. 2019-02-15T12:26:23-05:00

Details emerge in Bell murder case

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
During last week’s court hearing where Tayveon Bibb plead guilty to first-degree facilitation to commit robbery, Bibb shed light on the events around the 2016 shooting death of Lexus Bell, according to a recording of the proceeding obtained by the News-Democrat & Leader. Bibb had to give an account of what he did to necessitate the robbery facilitation charge to Judge Tyler Gill and did so last Tuesday. 2019-02-15T12:23:23-05:00

Kentucky Supreme Court rules on Fulton murder

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
The Kentucky Supreme Court on Thursday released an opinion upholding the 2017 conviction of a Fulton County man who killed another after a longstanding feud. In October 2016, William "Terry" Jamison shot and killed Mark Williams on a tract of farmland off Ky. 94. There were no witnesses. Jamison, now 62, was convicted of murder and sentenced in September 2017 to 20 years in prison. Jamison appealed his case based on allegations of prosecutorial misconduct and the contention that his rights were violated. 2019-02-15T12:19:59-05:00

High school evacuated after cellphone fire scare

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
Paducah Tilghman High School was evacuated for roughly 30 minutes Thursday morning when a student's cellphone caught fire. Wayne Walden, Paducah Independent School District spokesman, said the fire alarm at PTHS was activated at 8 a.m. and the fire department was notified of a small fire in the attendance office. A student's cellphone caught fire when she tried to fix it. 2019-02-15T12:16:07-05:00

Prosecutor: Knife, gunshots caused deaths of Murray women

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
The lead prosecutor in a case involving the deaths of two Murray women a week ago said Thursday that they died from the use of multiple weapons. Calloway Commonwealth’s Attorney Dennis Foust said he has learned that Evelyn Scott, 77, died as the result of knife wounds in an attack that is believed to have occurred sometime last Thursday, Feb. 7, at a residence on Catalina Drive. He said that Tera Todd, 37, who was serving as Scott’s caretaker, died after running to a next-door residence; Foust said he has learned she sustained both knife and gunshot wounds. 2019-02-15T12:12:22-05:00

How the Bluegrass State is preparing for a $20 million March Madness showcase

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
Bourbon, horse racing and basketball — they say that's what Kentucky does. At least one-third of that will be tested early in 2019. There will be a little extra "madness" in Kentucky come March as the commonwealth is gearing up to potentially host four NCAA Tournament events and the boys' and girls' high school state basketball tournaments in a 24-day span. 2019-02-15T12:03:39-05:00

Trump's national emergency draws different reactions from Kentucky's senators

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
President Donald Trump's expected plan to sign a government funding bill and declare a national emergency to get more money for his promised border wall drew two different reactions from Kentucky's senators. 2019-02-15T11:56:01-05:00

Could better oral hygiene help people avoid Alzheimer’s disease?

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
University of Louisville researcher Jan Potempa and a team of international scientists led by the pharmaceutical company Cortexyme Inc. recently made headlines for their research on a possible connection between chronic gum disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Potempa provided insight into their research in a Q&A with Insider Louisville. 2019-02-15T11:53:21-05:00

State education officials: Proposed accountability changes may violate federal law

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
Kentucky education officials fear that proposed changes to the school accountability system may violate the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Senate Bill 175, filed Tuesday by Republican Sen. David Givens, would “significantly change” how Kentucky identifies schools for support, a Kentucky Department of Education spokeswoman said Wednesday. And those changes may not comply with ESSA, the federal law mandating comprehensive and targeted support (CSI and TSI) identifiers, according to a legal analysis by KDE. 2019-02-15T11:48:19-05:00

Kentucky Senate approves NRA gun bill on anniversary of Parkland school shooting

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
The Kentucky Senate approved a bill Thursday that would allow people to carry a concealed handgun without a permit or training on the first anniversary of the Parkland, Fla., school shooting that killed 17 students and staff members. “This is how our state decided to mark that anniversary of the deadliest high school shooting in our nation’s history — pass more gun legislation, making it easier for people to carry weapons in our state,” said Connie Coartney, volunteer leader with the Kentucky chapter of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America. 2019-02-15T11:44:54-05:00

Bill that could make rooftop solar panels less lucrative advances to Kentucky House

February 15, 2019 - 2:36pm
A controversial bill that could make it less lucrative to install solar energy panels on Kentucky homes will go to the full House after it was approved 10-to-4 Thursday by the House Natural Resources and Energy Committee. Senate Bill 100, sponsored by state Sen. Brandon Smith, R-Hazard, could be heard by the full House as early as Friday. It was filed Monday and rushed through Senate committee and Senate floor votes in a matter of hours on Wednesday. “We suspect that Senate and House leadership just don’t want to have the controversy that would go with a bill that restricts the rights of their constituents,” said Matt Partymiller, president of the Kentucky Solar Industries Association. “This is a pro-utility bill. It doesn’t have a lot of popular support. If it doesn’t move fast, if it sees the light of day, it will have significant opposition.” 2019-02-15T11:39:02-05:00

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