Kentucky Press News Service

There’s much more to the First Amendment than you think

August 20, 2019 - 4:22pm
This month is the start of a new campaign to raise awareness about the First Amendment nationwide. The “Th1nk First” campaign was created in Nebraska, but media companies across the country, including this one, have since joined the effort. You have probably already seen newspaper advertisements promoting the five different freedoms the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees each of us. You may be wondering why it’s important to talk about the First Amendment. 2019-08-20T13:40:07-04:00

Watch out for misleading ads from ‘Doctor Patient Unity’

August 20, 2019 - 4:22pm
Kentucky’s two senators are among around a dozen targeted nationwide by a shadowy group using every trick in the book to conceal who they are and what their real motives are. If you’ve watched broadcast TV in Kentucky in recent weeks, you’ve probably seen the stoic woman warning you that legislation being considered right now could lead to doctor shortages and more expensive health care. But while the actor in the ads has plenty of confidence in what she’s saying, no one has any confidence in saying exactly who is running the ads. What is clear, thanks to recent digging and analysis by OpenSecrets.org, is that the secretive “Doctor Patient Unity” group is using dark money, obscuring its funders and playing tricks to avoid accountability in the run-up to the 2020 election. 2019-08-20T13:35:45-04:00

Matt Bevin: Kentucky teachers protested during school year to get off work

August 20, 2019 - 4:22pm
Gov. Matt Bevin suggested in a radio interview Tuesday morning that protesting teachers only caused "sickouts" while schools were in session because they wanted paid time off work, instead of protesting during the summer when it wouldn't affect students. The governor made the comments on the "Brian Thomas Morning Show" on 55-KRC in Cincinnati, pivoting from a discussion of the legality of teacher sickouts to questioning the motive and timing of those protests. "The same bill came forward again this summer when nobody was in school, and nobody showed up," Bevin said. "When it’s vacation time, people are a little less worked up it seems." 2019-08-20T13:21:21-04:00

Kentucky State Fair to require minors to have adult supervision after shooting scare

August 20, 2019 - 4:22pm
The Kentucky State Fair has altered its entry guidelines in the aftermath of Saturday night's shooting scare, now requiring juveniles entering the fairgrounds after 6 p.m. to be accompanied by a parent or guardian over the age of 21. The new guidelines will go into effect on Wednesday, according to a statement from Kentucky State Fair spokesman Ian Cox. IDs will be checked at the gate and there will be increased lighting and law enforcement on the scene during peak hours. 2019-08-20T13:17:59-04:00

Las Vegas man allegedly flew to Kentucky and tried to kidnap girl in school parking lot

August 20, 2019 - 4:22pm
A Las Vegas man was arrested Monday after he flew to Kentucky with hopes of convincing a high schooler to have sex with him, according to the Boone County Sheriff’s Office. Benjamin Margitza, 18, flew from Las Vegas to the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport Saturday night to make contact with a girl he met online around four years ago, according to the sheriff’s office. Margitza and the victim had a minimal amount of communication until recently, when he had contacted her making explicit, sexual statements and also saying he wanted to marry her, the sheriff’s office said. 2019-08-20T13:12:06-04:00

After hurdles, WKU President says campus will 'turn a corner' in new year

August 20, 2019 - 4:22pm
Speaking to faculty and staff Monday at Van Meter Hall, Western Kentucky University President Timothy Caboni aimed to turn the page on two tumultuous years when multiple rounds of budget and staffing cuts loomed large. “The past two years have been tough. Let me assure you, I understand how trying it has been. It hasn’t been easy. I get it,” Caboni said, reading from prepared remarks during his annual faculty and staff convocation address. 2019-08-20T13:07:39-04:00

Judge rules in favor of magistrate, police officer

August 20, 2019 - 4:22pm
A Clark County judge ruled Monday that a city police officer can serve simultaneously as an elected county magistrate. In a nine-page ruling, Clark Circuit Judge Brandy Oliver Brown said the two positions are not incompatible, and Travis Thompson can continue serving in both roles. Thompson was rehired by the Winchester Police Department in September 2018 and was elected as a magistrate to the Clark County Fiscal Court two months later. 2019-08-20T12:57:04-04:00

Couple indicted on fraud charges

August 20, 2019 - 4:22pm
A Marshall County grand jury has indicted a couple on Medicaid fraud charges, according to the Kentucky attorney general's office of Medicaid Fraud and Abuse Control. Last week, the grand jury indicted Ray Dufay, 54, and wife Melissa Dufay, 51, previously of Calvert City, both on one count of Medicaid fraud, a Class D felony. The grand jury also indicted Ray Dufay on one count of theft by deception over $500, also a Class D felony. 2019-08-20T12:55:33-04:00

Parker's mother recalls day of shooting

August 20, 2019 - 4:22pm
After hours of testimony, largely from law enforcement and defense attorneys centering on the timeline of events from the day of the Marshall County High School shooting, the mother of accused shooter Gabe Parker took the witness stand. Mary Garrison Minyard was the final witness to testify in a day-long hearing on a suppression motion in Marshall County Circuit Court Monday. Defense attorneys representing now 17-year-old Parker, accused of killing two and wounding several others on January 23, 2018, filed a motion last month to suppress statements he made to police that day, alleging he "wasn't in his right mind" and didn't understand his rights. 2019-08-20T12:49:06-04:00

Veterinarians see higher number of kennel cough cases

August 20, 2019 - 4:22pm
In the past few weeks, some Owensboro veterinarians have seen increased cases of canine infectious tracheobronchitis, commonly known as kennel cough. William Purdy, a managing veterinarian at Kentuckiana Animal Clinic, said his facility closed its dog boarding and grooming services last week in response to the clinic’s high number of kennel cough cases. Those services will reopen when the risk minimizes. 2019-08-20T12:44:06-04:00

Emotions run high in Parker hearing

August 20, 2019 - 4:22pm
Monday’s latest chapter in the case of a school shooting that occurred in January 2017 in Marshall County was supposed to focus on whether or not the accused shooter had his rights violated. However, as the hearing dragged forward, it became a day of raw emotion for many, both on the witness stand and in the audience as the testimony included, for the first time in court, bits and pieces of recollections that began to paint the picture of the horror that was Jan. 23, 2017 at Marshall County High School in Draffenville. 2019-08-20T12:38:48-04:00

Parents indicted for ‘filthy living conditions’

August 20, 2019 - 4:22pm
Two Winchester parents were indicted for wanton endangerment charges after police found their children living in a home infested with insects and covered in feces. Michael Wilburn, 41, and Laura Wilburn, 36, of 34 Franklin Ave., were arrested in July for second-degree criminal abuse charges after police officers were called to the residence to help social workers. 2019-08-19T12:51:54-04:00

Paper, plastic, panic: How the global recycling crisis is hitting Kentucky

August 20, 2019 - 1:22pm
On a breezy afternoon in June, a pile of Louisville’s recycling goods stood shoved into a massive, fluttering mound as tall as a house. Plastic bottles, soft drink cans, yogurt cups, crumpled newspapers, cereal boxes, cardboard — all smelling of sour garbage. Collected from bins at homes and businesses, much of the 13,000 tons of recyclables created monthly in Louisville and nearby counties stops first at this sorting facility run by WestRock Co. Then, it's off to paper mills, glass processors and metal brokers — the crucial final step in a cycle to repurpose traditionally valuable commodities, saving energy and precious landfill space in the process. But after years of convincing people to embrace the recycling habit, the $7.5 billion industry is in a panic, fueled by plunging commodities prices. It's leading many communities to ditch all or a part of their recycling programs, indefinitely or whenever new outlets open. 2019-08-20T12:27:51-04:00

Gov. Matt Bevin trolls Democrats at Kentucky State Fair in President Trump jacket

August 20, 2019 - 1:22pm
Gov. Matt Bevin is at it again. He paid a visit to the Kentucky Democrats' booth at the state fair in Louisville on Saturday clad in a bright blue jacket decorated with many large images of President Donald Trump's face. The gesture was soon all over social media as people called the move "trolling" and meme-worthy captions abounded. 2019-08-20T12:16:08-04:00

Republicans use McConnell allies to try and force his hand on election security

August 20, 2019 - 1:22pm
A conservative group is increasing pressure on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to put election security legislation up for a vote in the Senate by airing ads that target the Kentucky Republican and four other Republican senators in their home states. Republicans for the Rule of Law is unveiling new spots that urge Send. Marco Rubio, R-Florida, Roy Blunt, R-Missouri, Lindsey Graham, R-South Carolina, and James Lankford, R-Oklahoma, to push McConnell for a vote, urging them “don’t let Mitch McConnell stand in your way.” The group is also re-airing a 60-second ad that calls on McConnell to act. 2019-08-20T12:11:28-04:00

Ky. addiction doctor agrees to pay $1.4M over alleged fraudulent billing

August 20, 2019 - 1:22pm
An Ashland doctor and her clinic have agreed to pay $1.4 million to settle accusations they defrauded Medicare and Medicaid and provided prescriptions for an addiction-treatment drug to too many patients. Dr. Rose Uradu and her clinic, Ultimate Treatment Center, entered into the agreement with the federal government. Federal authorities alleged in a civil complaint that in 2014, Urdu wrote prescriptions for as many as 294 people a month for a drug called buprenorphine at a time when she was limited to 100 patients a month. 2019-08-20T12:09:31-04:00

Tax refund bill could cost Harlan schools $73,000

August 20, 2019 - 1:22pm
State and local officials are grappling with the touchy issue of a tax refund to a bankrupt coal company that could cost the Harlan County school system enough money to pay two teachers. The school district has not disputed that Revelation Energy overpaid a utility tax to the district by $73,000. However, it has balked at refunding the money because Revelation owes delinquent property taxes that support local services, including the school system. 2019-08-20T11:53:50-04:00

Player's good news is well received

August 20, 2019 - 1:22pm
News that Nebraska freshman and former Western Hills High standout Wan’Dale Robinson won’t be charged with possession of marijuana after a citation this summer has been well received by people who know him. “I’m definitely excited with how things turned out,” said Dale Robinson, Wan’Dale’s father. 2019-08-20T11:46:16-04:00

Teammates had lived changed a month apart

August 20, 2019 - 1:22pm
Tucker Shelton and Dalton Underwood have been friends and teammates for some time now. The LaRue County seniors are on the offensive and defensive lines. Sure, they are opposites in ways, but football is a game both love and enjoy. Unfortunately for the pair, they have something in common in events that happened 34 days apart. They lost their fathers. 2019-08-20T11:40:53-04:00

Superintendent: Newport school administrator involved in test cheating later became principal

August 20, 2019 - 1:22pm
An administrator at Newport schools was involved in test cheating before becoming a principal within the district, according to Superintendent Kelly Middleton. Bob Seiter was named principal of Newport Intermediate School ahead of the 2018-19 school year. Seiter was tapped to be principal before his involvement in cheating became known, Middleton told The Enquirer. Seiter had previously been an assistant principal. 2019-08-20T11:32:37-04:00

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